Natural infection in non-human primates with adult T-cell leukemia virus or a closely related agent

Miyoshi, I.; Fujishita, M.; Taguchi, H.; Matsubayashi, K.; Miwa, N.; Tanioka, Y.

International Journal of Cancer 32(3): 333-336

1983


ISSN/ISBN: 0020-7136
PMID: 6411631
DOI: 10.1002/ijc.2910320312
Accession: 043718500

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Abstract
A total of 703 sera from 10 species of monkeys were examined for the presence of antibodies to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)-associated antigens (ATLA). ATLA represent core protein(s) of ATL virus (ATLV) and ATLV-determined polypeptides. Anti-ATLA antibodies were found in all seven macaque species tested but not in three non-macaque species. The frequencies of seropositive macaques ranged from 10 to 50%. In three macaque species (Japanese monkeys, rhesus monkeys, and crab-eating monkeys) in which sufficient numbers of animals were studied, more females than males were anti-ATLA positive and the antibody-positive rate increased with age. In Japanese monkeys, over 70% were seropositive after the age of 10 years. A family study of Japanese monkeys suggested maternal transmission of ATLV or a closely related agent. These seroepidemiological features are consistent with those of Japanese in the ATL-endemic area. Three of 10 rhesus monkeys were found to be anti-ATLA-positive 13 days after arrival in Japan, suggesting that they had been infected with ATLV in Indonesia where they were captured. Thus, ATLV appears to be prevalent among several macaque species as well as in man, and its pathogenetic role in these non-human primates should be explored in relation to ATL in man.

Natural infection in non-human primates with adult T-cell leukemia virus or a closely related agent