EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
54,215,046
Abstracts:
30,230,908
PMIDs:
28,215,208
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Pleuropneumonia in pigs due to Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. I. A bibliographical review



Pleuropneumonia in pigs due to Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. I. A bibliographical review



Nordisk Veterinaermedicin 33(3): 121-133



During the last twenty years pleuropneumonia in pigs, caused by Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae, has spread globally. The increasing importance of the disease within swine production is apparently connected with increasing industrialization and subsequent heavy concentration of a large number of animals in the individual production unit. Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae seems to be specific for pigs. Several more or less pathogenic serotypes of the bacterium are known. Serotype 2 as occurring in Denmark is primary pathogen for pigs which have not previously been in contact with the infection. Immunity of varying strength and duration is left after recovery. Prolonged immunity in an animal is presumably dependent on latent infection or on repeated infections. Normally there is a large number of latently infected animals in attacked herds. Such animals, especially sows and boars, represent a potential infection reservoir which might be the basis of new clinical outbreaks under conditions of reduced herd immunity or of compromised general resistance of animal groups. Clinical disease is most frequently seen in young pigs and fatteners, as piglets are generally protected by maternal antibodies. Acute pleuropneumonia is characterized by high temperature, lost appetite, light cough and often vomiting. Morbidity is high, especially by new-infection where there may also be considerable mortality if adequate antibacterial therapy is neglected, however, normally the disease implies low mortality. The pathological lesions are localized to the respiratory organs. The lungs are the seat of fibrinous necrotising pneumonia (red, grey hepatization), more or less extensive, most frequently of the diaphragmatic part of the lung. Furthermore fibrinous, later on fibrous pleuritis and pericarditis may be seen. The fibrous pleuritis may be of decisive diagnostical value when established with high frequency in baconers. The disease causes losses as a consequence of increased use of medicine and reduced daily weight gain in fatteners. Optimum environment and feeding conditions will reduce such losses considerably. The use of commercially available vaccines makes it possible to fortify specific resistance against the disease in exposed groups of animals. In small herds with few infected animals the infection may be eliminated by discarding seropositive animals, combined with strategic medication. Elimination of the infectious agent in large herds can only take place by replacing all animals by an SPF-herd.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 043967222

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 7031596



Related references

Pleuro pneumonia in pigs due to haemophilus pleuropneumoniae parahaemolyticus bibliographical review. Nordisk Veterinaermedicin 33(3): 121-133, 1981

Identification of different serotypes of actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae equals haemophilus pleuropneumoniae isolated in mexico from pigs with pleuropneumonia during 1985 to 1988. Veterinaria - Mexico 20(2): 157-160, 1989

Vaccination against pleuropneumonia of pigs caused by Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. Canadian Veterinary Journal 22(2): 34-35, 1981

Identification of different serotypes of Actinobacillus (Haemophilus) pleuropneumoniae isolated in Mexico from pigs with pleuropneumonia form 1985 to 1988. Veterinaria Mexico 20(2): 157-160, 1989

Occurrence of a pleuropneumonia in swine due to a Pasteurella hemolytic-like organism. Its probable relation to pleuropneumonia due to Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde 125(11): 789-796, 1983

Pleuropneumonia in swine caused by actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. Norsk Veterinaertidsskrift 99(10): 713-716, 1987

Occurrence of pleuropneumonia in swine due to a Pasteurella haemolytica-like organism in Italy. Its probable relationship to pleuropneumonia due to Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae. Schweizer Archiv fur Tierheilkunde 125(11): 789-796, 1983

Role of haemophilus pleuropneumoniae lipopolysaccharide endotoxin in the pathogenesis of porcine Haemophilus pleuropneumonia. American Journal of Veterinary Research 48(5): 768-773, 1987

Characteristics of Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae Isolates and Some Epidemiological Findings on Porcine Haemophilus Pleuropneumonia in Saskatchewan. Canadian Veterinary Journal 23(7): 224-228, 1982

Pleuropneumonia caused by haemophilus pleuropneumoniae haemophilus parahaemolyticus in swine iii. epizootiologico clinical experiences and diagnosis. Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja 40(12): 723-728, 1985

Pleuropneumonia caused by haemophilus pleuropneumoniae equals haemophilus parahaemolyticus in swine vi. field vaccination trials. Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja 42(1): 23-28, 1987

Pleuropneumonia caused by haemophilus pleuropneumoniae equals haemophilus parahaemolyticus in swine v experiments for a efficacious vaccine. 1987