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The influence of orally-administered vitamin C or zinc on the absorption of and the biological response to lead



The influence of orally-administered vitamin C or zinc on the absorption of and the biological response to lead



Journal of Occupational Medicine 25(9): 668-678



A single-blind study was performed on male workers from a primary lead smelter to determine whether a daily oral supplement of vitamin C (1 g vitamin C orally once a day, five times a week for 20 weeks) or zinc (60 mg zinc as zinc gluconate once a day, five times a week for eight weeks) influences the absorption of and the biological (hematological and renal) response to lead. The vitamin C and the zinc study groups comprised 39 and 11 workers, respectively. Their blood levels of lead at the start of the experiment ranged from 28.9 to 76.4 micrograms/100 ml. A matched control group receiving a placebo was followed simultaneously. The results demonstrate that, in workers whose exposure to inorganic lead is moderate and who do not suffer from nutritional deficiencies, oral supplementation of vitamin C or zinc does not influence the metabolism and biological action of lead.

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Accession: 044664769

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 6631566

DOI: 10.1097/00043764-198309000-00015


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