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Work performance of high-altitude Aymara males



Work performance of high-altitude Aymara males



Annals of Human Biology 11(3): 227-233



The sample for this study consisted of 28 Aymara males between the ages of 15 and 43 years. The subjects were rural high-altitude natives who were temporarily working as porters in La Paz, Bolivia (3700 m). Mean VO2max was 46 X 5 ml/kg/min. There was a significant negative relationship between VO2max and age in adult porters . However, there was also a significant positive relationship between maximal work output and age and a significant negative relationship between VO2 during submaximal exercise and age. Relative work intensity (VO2/VO2max) during submaximal exercise did not change significantly with age. Thus, even though VO2max decreased significantly with age, these data suggest that there may not be a substantial decrease with age in the adaptive status of these men. Minimal support was found for the hypothesis that chest size in Andean highlanders influences the effectiveness of the oxygen transport system.

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Accession: 044988029

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 6742772

DOI: 10.1080/03014468400007101


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