+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

A pilot survey of social work services in pediatric primary care programs in urban teaching hospitals



A pilot survey of social work services in pediatric primary care programs in urban teaching hospitals



Ambulatory Pediatrics 1(5): 259-261



To determine the current status of social work presence in pediatric primary care clinics in urban teaching hospitals. Survey instrument mailed to the medical directors of outpatient pediatrics in the major pediatric teaching hospital of approved residency programs in the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. Sixty responses (60%) were received. Eighty percent of practices reported having on-site social work services, with a median of 14,805 annual clinic visits per social work full-time equivalent. Ninety-five percent of respondents considered on-site social work services in pediatric primary care to be important, whereas half of respondents considered social work services "less than adequate" at their site, and most of these felt this inadequacy had led to additional hospital visits or other adverse outcomes. There were no significant associations of reported adequacy of social work services with any characteristics of hospital, practice, or population. Pediatric primary care clinicians at teaching hospitals consider on-site social work services to be important, but most report these services are less than adequate in their practices, and for many, adequacy has declined.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 045093686

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 11888412


Related references

A survey of social work services in pediatric primary care. Pediatric Research 49(4 Part 2): 155A, 2001

The utilization of and reimbursement for social work and psychology services in an urban pediatric primary care practice. Pediatric Research 47(4 Part 2): 212A, 2000

Development of primary medical care programs by university teaching hospitals: issues related to patient care services. Transactions of the Association of American Physicians 83: 73-77, 1970

Social work services in pediatric primary care. Pediatric Research 47(4 Part 2): 211A, 2000

Development of primary medical care programs by university teaching hospitals: issues relating to student and house staff teaching programs in internal medicine. Transactions of the Association of American Physicians 83: 69-72, 1970

The primary care push. Teaching hospitals initiate programs to enhance their primary care physician base and help their communities. Trustee 46(4): 10-1, 27, 1993

Survey of social work services in epilepsy programs. Epilepsia 33(SUPPL 3): 26, 1992

Survey of palliative care programs in United States teaching hospitals. Journal of Palliative Medicine 4(3): 309-314, 2001

Teaching hospitals warn shift to primary care may hurt specialist programs. Modern Healthcare 25(14): 18, 1995

Primary care push. Teaching hospitals start programs to enhance MD base. Hospitals 67(6): 56-57, 1993

Pediatric palliative care programs in children's hospitals: a cross-sectional national survey. Pediatrics 132(6): 1063-1070, 2014

Medical handmaidens or professional colleagues: a survey of social work practice in the pediatrics departments of twenty-eight teaching hospitals. Social Work in Health Care 2(3): 275-283, 1977

Quality of primary care and its effect on emergency department use in an urban hospitals outpatient teaching clinic. JGIM 14(SUPPL 2): 21, 1999

Developing a bereavement services component for an urban teaching hospital's new palliative care program: a four-target survey approach. Journal of Palliative Medicine 8(4): 713-715, 2005

Desirability of Clinic-Based Financial Services in Urban Pediatric Primary Care. Journal of Pediatrics 202: 285-290, 2018