+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Changing physician behavior: a review of patient safety in critical care medicine



Changing physician behavior: a review of patient safety in critical care medicine



Journal of Critical Care 17(2): 138-145



The publication of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) report in July 2001 entitled "Making Health Care Safer: A Critical Analysis of Patient Safety Practices," represents a significant perceptual change in health care ideology. It can be argued that this compilation recognizes not only that medical errors occur in the health care system, but also that there are significant learning opportunities that may arise in the identification of these errors that are otherwise known as medical misadventures. The report concluded and outlined a series of 11 highly rated practices whose usage are associated with increased safety. The AHRQ report also articulated that there is a need to investigate methods used to align medical practice with evidence regarding patient safety. In other words, after the identification of the 11 priority safety practices, it is thus important to determine the most effective methods to change physician behavior toward these practices that will intuitively result in increased safety performance. Five different educational-based strategies have been identified as techniques to change physician behavior: (1) Academic Detailing, (2) Audit and Feedback, (3) Local Opinion Leaders, (4) Reminder Systems, and (5) Printed Material. This article reviews these strategies in the context of critical care medicine and offers some opinions regarding setting the future research agenda in this investigative field.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 045482379

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12096377

DOI: 10.1053/jcrc.2002.33940


Related references

The changing physician-patient relationship in critical care medicine under health care reform. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 150(1): 266-270, 1994

Improving patient care by changing physician behavior. Hospital Medical Staff 11(1): 2-8, 1982

Medication-related patient safety incidents in critical care: a review of reports to the UK National Patient Safety Agency. Anaesthesia 63(7): 726-733, 2008

Patient safety incidents associated with airway devices in critical care: a review of reports to the UK National Patient Safety Agency. Anaesthesia 64(4): 358-365, 2009

Review of patient safety incidents submitted from Critical Care Units in England & Wales to the UK National Patient Safety Agency. Anaesthesia 64(11): 1178-1185, 2009

Patient safety incidents associated with equipment in critical care: a review of reports to the UK National Patient Safety Agency. Anaesthesia 63(11): 1193-1197, 2008

Human factors and patient safety: changing roles in critical care. Australian Critical Care 24(4): 215-217, 2011

Changing practice to improve patient safety and quality of care in perinatal medicine. American Journal of Perinatology 29(1): 35-42, 2012

The negative impact of nurse-physician disruptive behavior on patient safety: a review of the literature. Journal of Patient Safety 5(3): 180-183, 2009

A transcultural, preventive ethics approach to critical-care medicine: restoring the critical care physician's power and authority. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23(6): 628-642, 1998

Clinical year in review IV: advances in critical care medicine, end-of-life care of the critically ill patient, asthma, and mechanical ventilation. Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society 7(5): 318-324, 2010

Effects of managed care on physician-patient relationships, quality of care, and the ethical practice of medicine: a physician survey. Archives of Internal Medicine 158(15): 1626-1632, 1998

National Patient Safety Agency: improving patient safety across all critical care areas. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 24(2): 137-140, 2008

Review of patient safety incidents reported from critical care units in North-West England in 2009 and 2010. Anaesthesia 67(7): 706-713, 2012

A review of patient safety incidents reported as 'severe' or 'death' from critical care units in England and Wales between 2004 and 2014. Anaesthesia 71(9): 1013-1023, 2016