+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Do depression symptoms predict early hypertension incidence in young adults in the CARDIA study? Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults



Do depression symptoms predict early hypertension incidence in young adults in the CARDIA study? Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults



Archives of Internal Medicine 160(10): 1495-1500



Hypertension has been linked to several psychological factors, including depression, but the relation between hypertension incidence and depressive symptoms has not been adequately examined. To determine if depressive symptoms independently predict hypertension incidence. A prospective, multicenter, epidemiological cohort of young adults (aged 23-35 years at study entry) from the general community without hypertension followed up for 5 years. A sample of 3343 adults from 4 urban areas stratified for race (black and white) from the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study. Hypertension incidence, which was defined as blood pressure higher than 160/95 mm Hg (assessed on a single occasion) or the use of prescribed antihypertensive medication. Participants with high scores (> or = 16) on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale were at significant risk for hypertension incidence compared with those with low CES-D scores (< or =7; odds ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-3.61) after adjustment for other hypertension risk factors (eg, age, resting systolic blood pressure at the 5-year examination, physical activity, daily alcohol use, parental history of hypertension, education, presence of diabetes mellitus or heart disease, sex, and race) in fixed logistic models. Those with intermediate depressive symptoms (CES-D scores 8-15) were also at significant risk (adjusted odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.98). These associations were significant in blacks alone but were not found in whites, who had a lower hypertension incidence (29 [2%] of 1806) than blacks (89 [6%] of 1537). Depressive symptoms were predictive of later hypertension incidence in young adults, and young blacks with depressive symptoms were at high risk of developing hypertension.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 045817345

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 10826464


Related references

Do depression symptoms predict early hypertension incidence in young adults in the CARDIA study?. Archives of Internal Medicine 160(10): 1495-1500, 2000

Serum carotenoid concentrations predict lung function evolution in young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 94(5): 1211-1218, 2011

Evaluating the Framingham hypertension risk prediction model in young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Hypertension 62(6): 1015-1020, 2013

Racial differences in early-onset renal disease among young adults: the coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 14(9): 2352-2357, 2003

Relationship of diastolic blood pressure with cyclic GMP excretion among young adults (the CARDIA Study): influence of a family history of hypertension. Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults. Journal of Hypertension 15(9): 955-962, 1997

Body mass index and early kidney function decline in young adults: a longitudinal analysis of the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study. American Journal of Kidney Diseases 63(4): 590-597, 2014

Associations of plant food, dairy product, and meat intakes with 15-y incidence of elevated blood pressure in young black and white adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 82(6): 1169-77; Quiz 1363-4, 2005

Incarceration as a predictor of future hypertension during young adulthood: The coronary artery risk development in young adults (cardia) study. 2008

White blood cell count in young adulthood and coronary artery calcification in early middle age: coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) study. European Journal of Epidemiology 28(9): 735-742, 2013

Prevalence and correlates of coronary calcification in black and white young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology 21(5): 852-857, 2001

Nonoptimal lipids commonly present in young adults and coronary calcium later in life: the CARDIA (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) study. Annals of Internal Medicine 153(3): 137-146, 2010

Association of hostility with coronary artery calcification in young adults: the CARDIA study. Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults. JAMA 283(19): 2546-2551, 2000

Abdominal obesity and coronary artery calcification in young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 86(1): 48-54, 2007

Plasma fibrinogen: levels and correlates in young adults. The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. American Journal of Epidemiology 138(12): 1023-1036, 1993

The impact of education on smoking status in young adults the cardia coronary artery risk development in young adults study. Circulation 78(4 Part 2): II584, 1988