EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Excess risk of bladder cancer in spinal cord injury: evidence for an association between indwelling catheter use and bladder cancer


Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 83(3): 346-351
Excess risk of bladder cancer in spinal cord injury: evidence for an association between indwelling catheter use and bladder cancer
To evaluate whether the risk of bladder cancer is greater in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) than in the general population and whether indwelling catheter (IDC) use is a significant independent risk factor for bladder cancer. Historical cohort study in which subjects with SCI were stratified according to bladder management method and followed for the development of bladder cancer. A large rehabilitation hospital in the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems. A total of 3670 patients with SCI who were evaluated for bladder cancer on at least 1 occasion by cystoscopy over a period of 1 to 47 years. Not applicable. Bladder cancer occurring after SCI determined by diagnosis at our facility, by subject report, or by report of next of kin. Twenty-one cases of bladder cancer were found in the 3670 study participants. The risk of bladder cancer for subjects with SCI using IDC is 77 per 100,000 person-years, corresponding to an age- and gender-adjusted standardized morbidity ratio (SMR) of 25.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.0--41.9) when compared with the general population. After controlling for age at injury, gender, level and completeness of SCI, history of bladder calculi, and smoking, those using solely IDC had a significantly greater risk of bladder cancer (relative risk [RR] = 4.9; 95% CI, 1.3--13.8) than those using nonindwelling methods. Mortality caused by bladder cancer in individuals with SCI was significantly greater than that of the US population (SMR = 70.6; 95% CI, 36.9--123.3). Bladder cancer risk and mortality are heightened in SCI compared with the general population. IDC is a significant independent risk factor for the increased risk of and mortality caused by bladder cancer in the SCI population.

(PDF same-day service: $19.90)

Accession: 046029886

PMID: 11887115

DOI: 10.1053/apmr.2002.29653



Related references

Chronic Indwelling Urinary Catheter Increase the Risk of Bladder Cancer, Even in Patients Without Spinal Cord Injury. Medicine 94(43): E1736-E1736, 2016

A method to minimize indwelling catheter calcification and bladder stones in individuals with spinal cord injury. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine 24(2): 105-108, 2001

Bladder cancer risk in patients with spinal cord injury. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine 21(3): 230-239, 1998

Identification of microRNAome in rat bladder reveals miR-1949 as a potential inducer of bladder cancer following spinal cord injury. Molecular Medicine Reports 12(2): 2849-2857, 2016

Bladder cancer in spinal cord injury patients A high risk malignancy?. Journal of Urology 167(4 Supplement): 278, April, 2002

Inducible nitric oxide synthase in the bladder of spinal cord injured patients with a chronic indwelling urinary catheter. Journal of Urology 165(5): 1457-1461, 2001

Bladder cancer and spinal cord injury. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine 26(4): 322-322, 2004

Bladder cancer in spinal cord injury patients. Journal of Urology 146(5): 1240-1242, 1991

Bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury. Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine 26(4): 335-338, 2004

Cancer of the bladder in spinal cord injury patients. Journal of Urology 125(2): 196-197, 1981