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Human monocytes and gingival fibroblasts release tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-6 in response to particulate and soluble fractions of Prevotella melaninogenica and Fusobacterium nucleatum



Human monocytes and gingival fibroblasts release tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-6 in response to particulate and soluble fractions of Prevotella melaninogenica and Fusobacterium nucleatum



International Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Research 23(3): 165-168



In this study we provide evidence that structural and soluble components of periodontopathogenic bacteria, such as Prevotella melaninogenica and Fusobacterium nucleatum, induce the release of cytokines in vitro known to cause in vivo necrotic inflammatory phenomena and bone resorption (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-6). Human monocytes and gingival fibroblasts were cultivated in vitro in the presence of both particulate and soluble bacterial fractions. A dose-dependent production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by monocytes and gingival fibroblasts was observed in the presence of fractions of P. melaninogenica and F. nucleatum. Interleukin-1 alpha was produced in approximately the same quantities in the presence of soluble fractions of either P. melaninogenica or F. nucleatum, but in greater quantities in response to particulate fractions of P. melaninogenica. Monocytes released larger amounts of interleukin-1 alpha (about 3000 pg/ml) than gingival fibroblasts (about 1500 pg/ml). Interleukin-6 was released in greater quantities by monocytes in the presence of the pellet fraction of P. melaninogenica (about 5.5 ng/ml), but gingival fibroblasts released larger amounts of interleukin-6, especially in the presence of particulate and soluble components of F. nucleatum (about 12 ng/ml). The ability to induce the release of these cytokines notably increases the pathogenic potential of the bacteria involved in the damage of periodontal tissue.

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Accession: 046289938

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PMID: 8400338


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