+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Integration of population education into agricultural extension services in Rwanda



Integration of population education into agricultural extension services in Rwanda



Imbonezamuryango 1991(20): 19-23



Rwanda's National Office of Population (ONAPO) in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, has recently completed a survey of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of agricultural workers and agricultural extension agents concerning fertility. The survey was also intended to identify the needs felt by the population regarding the health, social, and economic infrastructure and to formulate goals for a project to integrate population and agricultural development projects. The survey was conducted in 5 communes of Gitarama Prefecture. 43% of the 228 respondents had at least 2 children and 27% had 6 or more. The average respondent had 3.5 children. 33% of respondents were single and did not report any children. 81% of respondents married before age 25. The average number of children for households in the area was 7.20, but the number considered ideal or desirable was only slightly over 4. Intermediate sized families with 3-6 members with many small children not yet able to work appeared to have the greatest difficulty in satisfying their needs. 60% of respondents reported that they were unable to save any funds and 64% that their lands were insufficient to provide food self-sufficiency. 60.9% of respondents stated that the socioeconomic, health, and cultural services and facilities at their disposal were sufficient or satisfactory. The health services were most often seen as inadequate. 3/4 of the agricultural extension agents were satisfied with the means of transportation they used to visit the population. The results of focus group interviews with a wide variety of participants including men and women, young and old, educated and illiterate, have indicated that perceptions of the advantages of large families are slowly changing.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 046426201

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12343289


Related references

Integration of population education into the Rwanda educational system. Imbonezamuryango 1993(26): 5-14, 1993

Do agricultural extension services really matter? A study on the significance of agricultural extension services with special focus on women farmers in Mathira division of Kenya. Minor Field Studies International Office, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (217): 78 pp., 2002

Farmer education and extension services in selected Asian countries. Report of the study meeting on farmer education and extension services conducted in Japan, 26th June - 5th July, 1980. Farmer education and extension services in selected Asian countries Report of the study meeting on farmer education and extension services conducted in Japan, 26th June 5th July, 1980: 81; 144, 1980

Reframing agricultural extension education services: Canadian perspective. Journal of Extension Systems 12(2): 56-76, 1996

Agricultural education and extension services. Report to the government of Paraguay. Report, FAO (FAO-ESH-TA-3247): 23, 1974

Reframing agricultural extension education services in industrially developed countries. 1996

Agricultural education and extension training at tertiary level in Africa. Proceedings of a regional meeting on agricultural education and extension in East and Southern Africa held at Sokoine University of Agriculture Morogoro, Tanzania, 20th to 24th January, 1986. Agricultural education and extension training at tertiary level in Africa Proceedings of a regional meeting on agricultural education and extension in East and Southern Africa held at Sokoine University of Agriculture Morogoro, Tanzania, 20th to 24th January, 1986: iii + 104, 1986

Supporting role of the Agricultural Extension Services and implications for agricultural extension instructors as perceived by farmers in Esfahan, Iran. Journal of International Agricultural and Extension Education 14(1): 31-44, 2007

Farm and household advisory services in an areas far from the market with problems of growth. Consequences for agricultural extension and education. Berichte uber Landwirtschaft 59(4): 661-668, 1981

New developments in agricultural extension: privatization of extension services is as good as extension by governments or educational institutions. Journal of Extension Systems 3(2): 15-24, 1987

Future jobs in the agricultural sector and consequences for education and extension statement of opinion by the advisory council education and extension. Berichte ueber Landwirtschaft 67(4): 518-539, 1989

Integrating population and family life education in agricultural extension in Egypt. Human resources in agricultural and rural development: 172-185, 2000

Towards a new practice of agricultural extension in Rwanda. Bulletin agricole du Rwanda 21(1): 3-12, 1988

New agricultural extension methods in Rwanda. Revue Tiers Monde 27(106): 419-437, 1986

An analysis of the agricultural cooperative extension education of a land grant institution for arriving at recommendations for conducting successful agricultural extension activities in Iran. Dissertation Abstracts International, A Humanities and Social Sciences 45(8): 2332-2333, 1985