+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in Eastern Nigeria: implications, prospects and suggestions



Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in Eastern Nigeria: implications, prospects and suggestions



Sociologus; Zeitschrift für Empirische Soziologie Sozialpsychologische und Ethnologische Forschung. a Journal for Empirical Sociology Social Psychology and Ethnic Research 32(2): 97-126



Despite high birthrates in most of Nigeria, government population and development policies stress economic development rather than attempts to reduce fertility. Findings on family planning knowledge, attitude, and practice from a national fertility and family planning survey conducted by the former Institute of Population and Manpower Studies of the University of Ife in 1972 are presented for 1725 Eastern Nigerian households. A total of 1839 currently married women aged 10-49 and 1585 of their husbands responded to questions about 14 contraceptive methods divided into 3 categories: folk (withdrawal, douche, breastfeeding, and abstinence), traditional (condom, diaphragm, foam, rhythm, jelly, suppositories, sponge) and modern (pill, IUD, and injectables). On the whole, husbands had greater knowledge of traditional and modern methods, while wives knew more about folk methods, regardless of residence. Wives began to approximate the knowledge level of their husbands with increasing education. Fewer than 17% of husbands or wives of any education or residence category could explain the use of modern methods. Female respondents agreed that children now had greater odds of surviving to adulthood than a generation or more ago, but 54.6% in urban areas and 58.7% in rural areas disapproved any kind of birth control. About 42.5% of urban women and 29.3% of rural women approved of birth control. 42.8% of the women felt that families have become smaller than in the past, while 37.4% felt they were larger. The mean desired family size was 5.9 in urban areas and 8.2 in rural, and did not differ significantly by education. Family size was found to be positively associated with desire for more children. Almost 3/4 of women in urban and rural areas wanted more children. Among husbands, 66.8% reported ever using folk methods, 29.9% traditional methods, and 4.2% modern methods, while among wives, 73.3% reported ever using folk methods, 22.6% traditional methods, and 4.1% modern methods. Because the expressed desired family size is larger than the observed completed family size, it appears unlikely that family planning by itself will provide a solution to the population problem in Eastern Nigeria. The prevailing early marriage age, the lack of socially rewarding alternative life goals for women besides motherhood, the still high infant and child mortality levels, the lack of an ideal contraceptive method, and the lack of antinatalist political leadership do not augur well for the spread of family planning. The ideal population control strategy would combine mass education, establishment of maternal and child health programs, and cooperation from developed countries.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 046508592

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12265689


Related references

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning among Igbo women of south-eastern Nigeria. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 25(8): 792-795, 2005

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in rural communities in Nigeria. Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health 8(2): 85-90, 1995

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning amongst women in a high density low income urban of Enugu, Nigeria. African Journal of Reproductive Health 5(2): 83-89, 2001

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Family Planning amongst Women in a High Density Low Income Urban of Enugu, Nigeria. African Journal of Reproductive Health / La Revue Africaine de la Santé Reproductive 5(2): 83-89, 2001

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning amongst community health extension workers in Kaduna State, Nigeria. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 25(5): 494-499, 2005

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning methods among women attending antenatal clinic in Jos, North-central Nigeria. Nigerian Journal of Medicine 19(2): 214-218, 2010

The changing attitude and practice of men regarding family planning in Lagos, Nigeria. Public Health 99(6): 349-355, 1985

A peep into knowledge attitude and practice of family planning among naval sailors family residing in Bombay. Indian Journal of Public Health 32(3): 154-155, 1988

Knowledge attitude to modern family planning methods in Abraka communities, Delta State, Nigeria. East African Journal of Public Health 5(1): 10-12, 2008

An enquiry into knowledge attitude practice gap in family planning. An enquiry into knowledge attitude practice gap in family planning: 75, 1977

Knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in Hausa women. Social Science and Medicine 18(10): 839-844, 1984

Knowledge, attitude and practice surveys in family planning--a review. Nihae Bulletin 10(1): 51-60, 1977

Family planning knowledge, attitude and practice in the rural areas of Sarawak. Journal of Biosocial Science 11(3): 315-323, 1979

Knowledge, attitude and practice of Malay folk methods in family planning. Malaysian Journal of Reproductive Health 3(1 Supplement): S64, 1985

A study of knowledge, attitude and practice of family planning in West Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Family Planning 1: 1-10, 1967