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Modest effects of exercise training alone on coronary risk factors and body composition in coronary patients



Modest effects of exercise training alone on coronary risk factors and body composition in coronary patients



Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation 20(3): 180-188



Cardiac rehabilitation programs have evolved to become secondary prevention centers. However, the independent effect of exercise alone on coronary risk factors and body composition in patients with coronary artery disease has not been well studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of exercise training alone, without modification of dietary intake, on coronary risk factors and body composition in a coronary population. The authors studied 82 coronary patients (23 females and 59 males) aged 61.2 +/- 12.2 years (mean +/- SD) before and after a 3-month exercise training program. Outcome variables included serum lipid values, glucose, insulin, body composition, body fat distribution, macronutrient intake, and peak aerobic capacity. Neither male nor female patients experienced a significant overall improvement in plasma cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, or insulin levels after the 3-month exercise training program. Dietary macronutrient intake was unaltered during the study period. Peak aerobic capacity increased by 3.4 +/- 4.7 ml/kg/min (17%, P < 0.0001) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol increased from 38 +/- 10 to 41 +/- 11 mg/dL (8%, P < 0.001) after the rehabilitation program. Patients with baseline triglyceride levels over 200 mg/dL experienced a 22% decrease (from 374 +/- 205 to 293 +/- 190 mg/dL; P < 0.05) after conditioning. Patients with baseline HDL-cholesterol levels under 35 mg/dL also improved overall by 17% (from 29 +/- 3 to 34 +/- 5 mg/dL; P < 0.0001). Exercise-induced changes in plasma HDL-cholesterol were more related to changes in body composition and/or body fat distribution, rather than changes in peak aerobic capacity. Exercise conditioning alone resulted in relatively modest risk factor improvements in coronary patients after 3 months. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol measures increased by 3 +/- 8 mg/dL (8%). Patients with baseline triglyceride elevations experienced a 22% decrease. On the other hand, there were no overall effects on body weight, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, or insulin levels. For most patients, exercise effects were minimal and nutritional and medical therapy will need to be used more aggressively to attain nationally recognized risk factor goals.

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Accession: 046701647

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PMID: 10860200


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