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Multileaf collimator leaf sequencing algorithm for intensity modulated beams with multiple static segments



Multileaf collimator leaf sequencing algorithm for intensity modulated beams with multiple static segments



Medical Physics 25(8): 1424-1434



The "stop and shoot" method of producing intensity modulation using combinations of static multileaf collimator (MLC) segments has a number of advantages including precise dose delivery, easy verification, and general availability. However, due to the potential limitation of prolonged treatment time, it is essential to keep the number of required segments to a reasonable number. We propose an algorithm to minimize the number of segments for an intensity modulated field. In this algorithm, the sequence of delivery intensity is proposed to be a series of powers of 2, depending on the maximum intensity level in the matrix. The MLC leaf position sequence is designed directly on the two-dimensional intensity matrix to irradiate the largest possible area in each segment. The algorithm can be applied directly to MLC systems with different motion constraints. This algorithm has been evaluated by generating 1000 random 15 x 15 cm intensity matrices, each having from 3 to 16 intensity levels. Five clinical intensity modulated fields generated from the NOMOS CORVUS planning system for a complex clinical head and neck case were also tested with this and two other algorithms. The results of both the statistical and clinical studies showed that for all the intensity matrices tested, the proposed algorithm results in the smallest number of segments with a moderately increased monitor units. Thus it is well-suited for use in static MLC intensity modulation beam delivery. For MLC systems with interleaf motion constraint, we prove mathematically that this constraint reduces the tongue and groove effect at the expense of an increase of 25% in the number of segments.

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Accession: 046739007

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9725129

DOI: 10.1118/1.598315



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