Nutritional supplementation of the leucine metabolite beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (hmb) during resistance training

Panton, L.B.; Rathmacher, J.A.; Baier, S.; Nissen, S.

Nutrition 16(9): 734-739

2000


ISSN/ISBN: 0899-9007
PMID: 10978853
DOI: 10.1016/s0899-9007(00)00376-2
Accession: 046840163

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Abstract
The effects of supplementation of the leucine metabolite beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) were examined in a resistance training study. Thirty-nine men and 36 women between the ages of 20-40 y were randomized to either a placebo (P) supplemented or HMB supplemented (3.0 g HMB/d) group in two gender cohorts. All subjects trained three times per week for 4 wk. In the HMB group, plasma creatine phosphokinase levels tended to be suppressed compared to the placebo group following the 4 wk of resistance training (HMB:174. 4 +/- 26.8 to 173.5 +/- 17.0 U/L; P:155.0 +/- 20.8 to 195.2 +/- 23.5 U/L). There were no significant differences in strength gains based on prior training status or gender with HMB supplementation. The HMB group had a greater increase in upper body strength than the placebo group (HMB:7.5 +/- 0.6 kg; P:5.2 +/- 0.6 kg; P = 0.008). The HMB groups increased fat-free weight by 1.4 +/- 0.2 kg and decreased percent fat by 1.1% +/- 0.2% while the placebo groups increased fat-free weight by 0.9 +/- 0.2 kg and decreased percent fat by 0.5% +/- 0.2% (fat-free weight P = 0.08, percent fat P = 0.08, HMB compared to placebo). In summary, this is the first short-term study to investigate the roles of gender and training status on the effects of HMB supplementation on strength and body composition. This study showed, regardless of gender or training status, HMB may increase upper body strength and minimize muscle damage when combined with an exercise program.