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Occurrence of the diffuse amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposits with numerous Abeta-containing glial cells in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease



Occurrence of the diffuse amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposits with numerous Abeta-containing glial cells in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease



Glia 25(4): 324-331



Diffuse amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposits with numerous glial cells containing C-terminal Abeta fragments occur in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease. By using a panel of antibodies specific for various epitopes in the Abeta peptide, we have investigated the immunohistochemical nature of the diffuse Abeta deposits. The extracellular material contains Abeta with a C-terminus at residue valine40 (Abeta40) as well as residues alanine42/threonine43 (Abeta42). The N-termini include aspartate1, pyroglutamate3, and pyroglutamate11, with pyroglutamate3 being dominant. Microglia and astrocytes in and around these deposits contain intensely staining granules. Most of these granules are negative for antibodies to the N-terminally located sequences of Abeta. These include 6E10 (Abeta1-17), 6F/3D (Abeta8-17), and the N-terminal antibodies specific to aspartate1, pyroglutamate3, and pyroglutamate11. The C-termini of intraglial Abeta are comparable with those of the extracellular deposits. The microglia and astrocytes have quiescent morphology compared with those associated with senile plaques and other lesions such as ischemia. Complement activation in these deposits is not prominent and often below the sensitivity of immunohistochemical detection. Although factors which may cause this type of deposit remain unclear, lack of strong tissue responses suggests that these deposits are a very early stage of Abeta deposition. They were found only inconsistently and were absent in a number of cases examined in this study. Further analysis of these deposits might provide important clues regarding the accumulation and clearance of Abeta in Alzheimer's disease brain.

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Accession: 046850123

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PMID: 10028915


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