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Phenol degradation by yeasts isolated from industrial effluents



Phenol degradation by yeasts isolated from industrial effluents



Journal of General and Applied Microbiology 47(4): 213-221



Yeast strains of the genera Aureobasidium, Rhodotorula and Trichosporon were isolated from stainless steel effluents and tested for their ability to utilize phenol as the sole carbon source. Fourteen strains grew in the presence of up to 10 mm phenol. Only the strain Trichosporon sp. LE3 was able to grow in the presence of up to 20 mm phenol. An inhibitory effect was observed at concentrations higher than 11 mm, resulting in reduction of specific growth rates. Phenol degradation was a function of strain, time of incubation and initial phenol concentration. All strains exhibited activity of catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and phenol hydroxylase in free cell extracts from cells grown on phenol, suggesting that catechol was oxidized by the ortho type of ring fission. Addition of glucose and benzoate reduced the phenol consumption rate, and both substrates were used simultaneously. Glucose concentrations higher than 0.25% inhibited the induction of phenol oxidation by non-proliferating cells and inhibited phenol oxidation by pre-induced cells.

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Accession: 046973222

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PMID: 12483621


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