+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Phenotype and engraftment potential of cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells



Phenotype and engraftment potential of cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells



Current Opinion in Hematology 4(3): 176-182



Cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell products are increasingly used for hematopoietic reconstitution after myeloablative therapy. Favorable engraftment kinetics, the ease of harvest, and the large number of CD34+ cells obtained that allow for graft manipulations (ie, tumor cell or T-cell depletion) have made this stem cell source an attractive alternative to marrow. More recent data suggest that in addition to the increased number of CD34 cells, there may be also qualitative differences between leukapheresis products and marrow. In the allogeneic transplantation setting, the one log more T cells contained in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared with marrow has not translated into more severe graft-versus-host disease, indicating possible differences in T-cell or accessory-cell function. Whether such differences will compromise graft-versus-leukemia effects and disease-free survival remains to be seen. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to speculate that cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood products may eventually replace marrow as a source for hematopoietic stem cells. However, each new mobilization strategy needs to be evaluated carefully, as comparable increases in CD34 cell numbers may not necessarily affect the same, as yet underlined, qualitative changes that make this product so attractive.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 046973621

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 9209833

DOI: 10.1097/00062752-199704030-00004


Related references

T-cells from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells and not CD34 cells facilitate engraftment of donor marrow in non-myeloablated recipients. Blood 96(11 Part 1): 765a, 2000

G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells added to marrow facilitates engraftment in nonmyeloablated canine recipients: CD3 cells are required. Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation 7(11): 613-619, 2001

Durable engraftment of AMD3100-mobilized autologous and allogeneic peripheral-blood mononuclear cells in a canine transplantation model. Blood 106(12): 4002-4008, 2005

Extending the duration of postgrafting cyclosporine but not substituting GCSF mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells for marrow enhances allogeneic engraftment in a nonmyeloablative canine transplant model. Blood 96(11 Part 1): 763a, 2000

Effects of extending the duration of postgrafting immunosuppression and substituting granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells for marrow in allogeneic engraftment in a nonmyeloablative canine transplantation model. Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation 7(9): 513-516, 2001

Mononuclear cells from the cord blood and granulocytecolony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood: is there a potential for treatment of cerebral palsy?. Neural Regeneration Research 10(12): 2018-2024, 2015

Erythropoietin priming improves the vasculogenic potential of G-CSF mobilized human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cardiovascular Research 104(1): 171-182, 2014

Normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor have increased osteoclastogenic potential compared to nonmobilized blood. Blood 87(5): 1802-1808, 1996

Early-acting cytokine-driven ex vivo expansion of mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells generates post-mitotic offspring with preserved engraftment ability in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. British Journal of Haematology 114(4): 920-930, 2001

Differing engraftment potential of human hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood of human/sheep chimeras. Blood 94(10 Suppl. 1 Part 1): 664a, 1999

Short-term repopulating cells with myeloid potential in human mobilized peripheral blood do not have a side population (SP) phenotype. Blood 108(6): 2121-2123, 2006

Stem cells and not committed progenitor cells mediate engraftment following transplantation of murine cytokine-mobilized blood cells. British Journal of Haematology 93(Suppl. 2): 135, 1996

No role for committed progenitor cells in engraftment following transplantation of murine cytokine-mobilized blood cells. Blood 86(10 Suppl. 1): 112A, 1995

Stem cells and not progenitor cells mediate engraftment in cytokine-mobilized blood cell transplantation. Experimental Hematology 23(8): 785, 1995