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Phenotypic and genotypic resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV-1 clinical isolates



Phenotypic and genotypic resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV-1 clinical isolates



HIV Medicine 2(4): 231-235



To assess phenotypic and genotypic cross-resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in patients treated with a combination including zidovudine, who were switched to a combination including stavudine. We analysed 24 clinical HIV-1 isolates from 12 patients before and several months after therapeutic switching. Plasma HIV-1 RNA was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Roche). Genotypic resistance was measured by sequencing the reverse transcriptase gene from plasma HIV-1 RNA. Phenotypic resistance was measured using a recombinant assay (Virco). Patients were treated with a combination including zidovudine for a mean (+/- SEM) period of 21.8 +/- 3.5 months and had a plasma viral load of 4.1 +/- 0.2 log HIV-1 RNA copies/mL (time 1). After a mean period of 19.3 +/- 1.6 months following the therapeutic change, the plasma viral load was 3.6 +/- 0.1 log copies/mL (time 2). At time 1, genotypic resistance to zidovudine was found in all cases (41L: four cases; 41L, 215Y: five cases; 41L, 210W, 215Y: two cases; K70R: one case) with a mean 6.6 +/- 1.6-fold increase in the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) to zidovudine and 1.7 +/- 0.4-fold to stavudine. At time 2, genotypic resistance to zidovudine was found in 11 out of 12 cases (41L: two cases; 41L, 215Y: six cases; 41L, 210W, 215Y: two cases; M41L, D67N, L210W, T215Y: one case) with a mean 18.9 +/- 8.8-fold increase in the IC50 to zidovudine and 1.4 +/- 0.4-fold to stavudine In this clinical series of patients with suboptimal control of plasma HIV-1 RNA using a combination including zidovudine, the presence of zidovudine-related mutations was associated with a decreased phenotypic sensitivity to this drug. Despite persistent HIV-1 replication, switching to stavudine was associated with a further decrease in phenotypic sensitivity to zidovudine but not to stavudine after 19 months. These data suggest that stavudine remains a possible option in zidovudine-experienced patients.

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Accession: 046973929

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 11737402

DOI: 10.1046/j.1468-1293.2001.00078.x


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