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Postoperative nausea and vomiting after craniotomy for tumor surgery: a comparison between awake craniotomy and general anesthesia



Postoperative nausea and vomiting after craniotomy for tumor surgery: a comparison between awake craniotomy and general anesthesia



Journal of Clinical Anesthesia 14(4): 279-283



To assess the frequency of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in patients following an awake craniotomy compared to general anesthesia for tumor surgery. Prospective observational and chart review of all patients having a craniotomy for tumor during one year. Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and intensive care unit (ICU) of a university hospital. 187 patients were reviewed. 107 patients who had a craniotomy for supratentorial tumor that was less than six hours in duration were analyzed and compared (50 awake craniotomy vs. 57 general anesthesia). Medical records were reviewed for events after the first four hours until discharge. The occurrence and the time of any nausea, vomiting; the administration of antiemetics and analgesic drugs; and complications were documented. Frequency of nausea, vomiting, administration of antiemetics and analgesia, and outcome between the two groups were compared using Chi-square and Student's t-test. The frequency of nausea (4% vs. 23%; p = 0.012) and vomiting (0% vs. 11%; p = 0.052) were less in patients having an awake craniotomy compared to general anesthesia, but only during the first four hours. The administration of postoperative analgesia was not different between the two groups and did not influence the frequency of PONV. The frequency of PONV during the initial recovery phase was less in patients having an awake craniotomy for tumor surgery than in patients having a similar procedure with general anesthesia.

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Accession: 047025370

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12088812

DOI: 10.1016/s0952-8180(02)00354-9


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