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Prospective evaluation of a prostacyclin-sparing aspirin formulation and heparin/warfarin in aspirin users with unstable angina or non-Q wave myocardial infarction at rest. the Antithrombotic Therapy in Acute Coronary Syndromes Research Group

Cohen, M.; Parry, G.; Adams, P.C.; Xiong, J.; Chamberlain, D.; Wieczorek, I.; Fox, K.A.; Kronmal, R.; Fuster, V.

European Heart Journal 15(9): 1196-1203

1994


ISSN/ISBN: 0195-668X
PMID: 7982419
DOI: 10.1093/oxfordjournals.eurheartj.a060653
Accession: 047105349

The aim of this trial was to compare the efficacy of combination antithrombotic therapy with a prostacyclin-sparing aspirin plus anticoagulation versus conventional aspirin plus anticoagulation, when added to antianginal therapy, in patients with unstable angina or non-Q wave myocardial infarction already being treated with aspirin. In a double-blind (for the aspirin) study, 144 prior aspirin users were randomized; 72 patients received controlled-release, prostacyclin-sparing aspirin 75 mg daily plus anticoagulation (intravenous heparin followed by warfarin to maintain the international normalized ratio at 2-3), and 72 patients received conventional aspirin 75 mg daily plus the same anticoagulation. Controlled-release aspirin was formulated to preserve endothelial cell prostacyclin synthesis. Trial therapy was begun by 13.2 +/- 12.3 h of qualifying pain, and continued for 12 weeks. The frequency of recurrent angina with electrocardiographic changes, myocardial infarction, or death, was analysed by intention to treat. At 12 weeks, events were: [table: see text] Twenty-six of the 42 (62%) recurrent ischaemic events occurred within 7 days of presentation. Four of the 144 patients (3%) experienced a major bleeding complication. It is concluded that in spite of maximal antithrombotic therapy, there is a significant failure rate of medical therapy in aspirin users presenting with unstable angina or non-Q wave myocardial infarction while at rest. Prostacyclin-sparing aspirin offers no clinical benefit over conventional aspirin.

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