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Seeding of intravascular stents by the xenotransplantation of genetically modified endothelial cells



Seeding of intravascular stents by the xenotransplantation of genetically modified endothelial cells



Seminars in Interventional Cardiology 3(3-4): 217-220



A novel approach of cell seeding of stents using xenotransplanted endothelium is proposed. The advantages of this approach are that these doubly transgenic animals will provide a limitless supply of endothelial cells producing controllable levels of active compound. These foreign cells will act as Trojan horses, graciously accepted at face value by the host organism, but capable of modifying the pathophysiological response to vessel damage, typified by the process of restenosis. Once implanted, the production of the bioactive compound is under exogenous control by means of 'designer' genes coding for modified cell surface receptors, which are introduced with the transgene to provide controllable levels of compound. Interaction of an orally administered compound with the modified cell receptor will switch on the transgene, while in its absence the transgene remains dormant. We have been able to show the feasibility this type of approach has for other animal species, and it shows great potential for application to humans.

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Accession: 047323068

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PMID: 10406697


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