+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine coated central venous catheters in haematological patients--a double-blind, randomised, prospective, controlled trial



Chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine coated central venous catheters in haematological patients--a double-blind, randomised, prospective, controlled trial



Supportive Care in Cancer 13(12): 993-1000



Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential for the intensive care of patients with haematological illness. Catheter-related infections (CRI) are an important problem in modern medicine, which may lead to life-threatening situations, to prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost. In immunocompromised patients suffering from haemato-oncological diseases, CRI is a significant factor for adverse outcome. Several clinical studies have shown that CVCs coated with antiseptics such as chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine (CHSS) reduce the risk of catheter-related bacteraemia. Most studies, however, were performed on intensive care patients not suffering from chemotherapy-induced immunosuppression. A prospective double-blind, randomised, controlled trial was performed to investigate the effectiveness of CHSS-coated catheters in haemato-oncological patients. A total number of 184 catheters (median duration of placement, 11 days) were inserted into 184 patients (male 115, female 69), of which 90 were antiseptically coated. After removal, all catheters were investigated for bacterial growth. Catheters coated with CHSS were effective in reducing the rate of significant bacterial growth on either the tip or subcutaneous segment (26%) compared to control catheters (49%). The incidence of catheter colonisation was also significantly reduced (12% coated vs 33% uncoated). Data obtained show a significant reduction of catheter colonisation in CHSS catheters. There was no significant difference in the incidence of catheter-related bacteraemia (3% coated vs 7% uncoated). However, due to the overall low rate of CRI, we could not observe a significant reduction in the incidence of catheter-related bacteraemia. Our data show that the use of CHSS catheters in patients with haematological malignancy reduces the overall risk of catheter colonisation and CRI, although the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia was similar in both groups.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 048510413

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 15834740

DOI: 10.1007/s00520-005-0812-9


Related references

Double-lumen central venous catheters impregnated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine to prevent catheter colonisation in the intensive care unit setting: a prospective randomised study. Journal of Hospital Infection 72(3): 227-233, 2009

Evaluation of chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters for the prevention of bloodstream infection in leukaemic patients: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Hospital Infection 37(2): 145-156, 1997

Reduction of central venous catheter-related infection in cancer patients with severe neutropenia A prospective controlled randomized trial using a chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine impregnated central venous line. Abstracts of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 41: 447, 2001

Antimicrobial chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-coated central venous catheters versus those uncoated in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Supportive Care in Cancer 17(2): 145-151, 2009

Reduction of catheter-related infections in neutropenic patients: a prospective controlled randomized trial using a chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine-impregnated central venous catheter. Annals of Hematology 84(4): 258-262, 2005

Influence of triple-lumen central venous catheters coated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine on the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia. Archives of Internal Medicine 158(1): 81-87, 1998

Prevention of intravascular catheter-related infection with newer chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine-coated catheters: a randomized controlled trial. Intensive Care Medicine 30(5): 837-843, 2004

Effect of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine coating on microbial colonization of central venous catheters in a multicenter trial. Abstracts of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 41: 439, 2001

Bacterial contamination of central venous catheters during insertion: a double blind randomised controlled trial. Pediatric Surgery International 21(7): 507-511, 2005

Evaluation of a triple-lumen central venous catheter heparin-bonded versus a catheter coated with chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine in critically ill patients A randomized, clinical trial. Abstracts of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 41: 426, 2001

Effectiveness of Minocycline and Rifampin vs Chlorhexidine and Silver Sulfadiazine-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters in Preventing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection in a High-Volume Academic Intensive Care Unit: A Before and after Trial. Journal of the American College of Surgeons 221(3): 739-747, 2015

Anti-infective external coating of central venous catheters: a randomized, noninferiority trial comparing 5-fluorouracil with chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine in preventing catheter colonization. Critical Care Medicine 38(11): 2095-2102, 2010

Prevention of colonization of central venous catheters by silver-sulfadiazine-chlorhexidine bonding A pilot study in critical care patients. Anesthesiology 79(3A): A294, 1993

Benefits of minocycline and rifampin-impregnated central venous catheters. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, multicenter trial. Intensive Care Medicine 30(10): 1891-1899, 2004