+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Factors associated with receiving help and risk factors for disaster-related distress among Connecticut adults 5-15 months after the September 11th terrorist incidents



Factors associated with receiving help and risk factors for disaster-related distress among Connecticut adults 5-15 months after the September 11th terrorist incidents



Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 41(4): 261-270



To obtain prevalence estimates and identify factors associated with psychological problems and receipt of help by a geographically proximate population in which some persons had direct exposure but the overall prevalence of direct exposure was low, 5-15 months after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist incidents. Telephone survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) (Connecticut Module) with a randomly selected cohort of 2741 women and 1899 men aged 18 and older were examined using bivariate Chi Square and multivariate logistic regression analyses of weighted data. One in three respondents reported 9/11-related psychological problems, 26% of whom reported receiving formal services or peer support. Risk factors for reporting psychological problems included being surveyed earlier, female gender, age 64 or younger, Hispanic ethnicity, disability, recent depression, and reporting one day or more in the past 30 of poor mental health, sleep problems or worry. Poor mental health was associated with receipt of formal services, and increased alcohol use was associated with receipt of peer support. In the post-impact recovery period following mass trauma, psychological problems by persons with ongoing mental health conditions or increased alcohol use warrant continuing public and professional attention. Women, Hispanics, and disabled adults also may be under-served.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 049059213

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 16479326

DOI: 10.1007/s00127-006-0031-9


Related references

Psychological and health problems in a geographically proximate population time-sampled continuously for three months after the September 11th, 2001 terrorist incidents. Anxiety Stress and Coping 20(2): 129-146, 2007

Psychological resilience after disaster: New York City in the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attack. Psychological Science 17(3): 181-186, 2006

Psychological distress among American Red Cross disaster workers responding to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Psychiatry Research 149(1-3): 303-308, 2006

On-site medical care during the September 11th WTC terrorist attack rescue and recovery effort and the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). Medicine and Health Rhode Island 86(11): 354-356, 2003

Posttraumatic stress symptoms, PTSD, and risk factors among lower Manhattan residents 2-3 years after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Journal of Traumatic Stress 21(3): 264-273, 2008

Processing bias for terror-related stimuli and September 11th-related distress in college students. Psychological Reports 101(3 Pt 1): 787-795, 2008

Medical ethics after the September 11th terrorist attacks. Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift 114(5-6): 165-166, 2002

Assessment of psychosocial factors and distress in women having adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer: the relationship among emotional distress and patient and treatment-related factors. Springerplus 5: 486, 2016

New onset delusions in the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attacks. Journal of Psychiatric Practice 13(6): 405-410, 2007

The impact of the September 11th terrorist attacks on psychiatric patients: a review. Clinical Psychology Review 29(4): 339-347, 2009

Psychiatric patients' vulnerability in the wake of the September 11th terrorist attacks. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 190(12): 833-838, 2002

Mental health utilization in Manhattan following the September 11th terrorist attacks. American Journal of Epidemiology 155(11 Suppl.): S89, 2002

Predictors of peritraumatic reactions and PTSD following the September 11th terrorist attacks. Psychiatry 69(2): 130-141, 2006

Social categorization and fear reactions to the September 11th terrorist attacks. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 29(12): 1509-1520, 2003

The effect of the September 11th terrorist attacks on drinking in a national sample. Alcoholism Clinical & Experimental Research 26(5 Suppl.): 29A, 2002