+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis



Functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis



Chinese Medical Sciences Journal 21(4): 228-233



To study the activation changes of the brain in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) while executing sequential finger tapping movement using the method of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Fifteen patients with definite or probable ALS and fifteen age and gender matched normal controls were enrolled. MRI was performed on a 3. 0 Tesla scanner with standard headcoil. The functional images were acquired using a gradient echo single shot echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence. All patients and normal subjects executed sequential finger tapping movement at the frequency of 1-2 Hz during a block-design motor task. Structural MRI was acquired using a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo (3D-FSPGR) sequence. The fMRI data were analyzed by statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Bilateral primary sensorimotor cortex (PSM), bilateral premotor area (PA), bilateral supplementary motor area (SMA), bilateral parietal region (PAR), contralateral inferior lateral premotor area (ILPA), and ipsilateral cerebellum showed activation in both ALS patients and normal controls when executing the same motor task. The activation areas in bilateral PSM, bilateral PA, bilateral SMA, and ipsilateral cerebellum were significantly larger in ALS patients than those in normal controls (P < 0.05). Extra activation areas including ipsilateral ILPA, bilateral posterior limb of internal capsule, and contralateral cerebellum were only detected in ALS patients. Similar activation areas are activated in ALS patients and normal subjects while executing the same motor task. The increased activation areas in ALS patients may represent neural reorganization, while the extra activation areas in ALS patients may indicate functional compensation.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 049121607

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17249197


Related references

Word retrieval in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Brain 127(Pt 7): 1507-1517, 2004

Pattern of cortical reorganization in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Experimental Brain Research 143(1): 51-56, 2002

Altered motor network functional connectivity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Neuroreport 24(12): 657-662, 2013

Correlation between corticospinal tract degeneration through magnetic resonance imaging, and functional scale (ALSFRS) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria 65(3b): 869-874, 2007

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nakano, I, Hirano, A International Congress Series; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Progress and perspectives in basic research and clinical application 339-347, 1996

Integration of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Brain 134(Pt 12): 3470-3479, 2011

Degeneration of the pyramidal tracts in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A premortem and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging study. Journal of Neuroimaging 7(4): 208-212, 1997

Molecular imaging of brain lipid environment of lymphocytes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging and SECARS microscopy. Physiological Research 60(Suppl. 1): S121-S127, 2011

Differential sensorimotor cortex activation following cutaneous stimulation of the hand and foot in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis The effect of the Babinski response A functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Neurology 50(4 Suppl. 4): A316-A317, 1998

Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: are findings suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis of any diagnostic utility?. Pm and R 3(6): 594-595, 2011

Magnetic resonance imaging in patients of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia. Brain and Nerve 61(11): 1259-1268, 2009

Cardiac Findings in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study. Frontiers in Neurology 8: 479, 2017

Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities of the tongue in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Neurologia 33(4): 276-278, 2018

Is magnetic resonance imaging a plausible biomarker for upper motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/primary lateral sclerosis or merely a useful paraclinical tool to exclude mimic syndromes? A critical review of imaging applicability in clinical routine. Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria 70(7): 532-539, 2012

Topographic distribution of brain iron deposition and small cerebrovascular lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates. Acta Neurologica Belgica 117(4): 873-878, 2017