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Interaction of inhalational anaesthetics with CO2 absorbents



Interaction of inhalational anaesthetics with CO2 absorbents



Best Practice and Research. Clinical Anaesthesiology 17(1): 63-76



We review the currently available carbon dioxide absorbents: sodium hydroxide lime (=soda lime), barium hydroxide lime, potassium-hydroxide-free soda lime, calcium hydroxide lime and non-caustic lime. In general, all of these carbon dioxide absorbents are liable to react with inhalational anaesthetics. However, there is a decreasing reactivity of the different absorbents with inhalational anaesthetics: barium hydroxide lime >> soda lime > potassium-hydroxide-free soda lime > calcium hydroxide lime and non-caustic lime. Gaseous compounds generated by the reaction of the anaesthetics with desiccated absorbents are those that threaten patients. All measures are comprehensively described to--as far as possible--prevent any accidental drying out of the absorbent. Whether or not compound A, a gaseous compound formed by the reaction of sevoflurane with normally hydrated absorbents, is still a matter of concern is discussed. Even after very high loading with this compound, during long-lasting low-flow sevoflurane anaesthesias, no clinical or laboratory signs of renal impairment were observed in any of the surgical patients. Finally, guidelines for the judicious use of different absorbents are given.

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Accession: 049373499

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 12751549

DOI: 10.1053/bean.2003.0269


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