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Neurotropism of swine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (coronavirus) in mice depending upon host age and route of infection



Neurotropism of swine haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (coronavirus) in mice depending upon host age and route of infection



Journal of Comparative Pathology 130(1): 58-65



Mice aged 1, 4 or 8 weeks were inoculated with haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (HEV), strain 67N, by the intracerebral (i.c.), intranasal (i.n.), intraperitoneal (i.p.), subcutaneous (s.c.), intravenous (i.v.) or oral route, with different doses. In 1-week-old mice, mortality and mean time to death were mostly the same regardless of the inoculation route, except for the oral route, which appeared to be the least effective. The virus killed 4-week-old mice readily by all routes of inoculation except the oral, and 8-week-old mice by i.c., i.n. or s.c. inoculation. In descending order of efficacy, the routes of HEV infection were: i.c., i.n., s.c., i.p., i.v. and oral. To follow the spread of HEV from peripheral nerves to the central nervous system (CNS), the virus was inoculated subcutaneously into the right hind leg of 4-week-old mice. The virus was first detected in the spinal cord on day 2, and in the brain on day 3. The brain titres became higher than those of the spinal cord, reaching a maximum of 10(7)PFU/0.2 g when the animals were showing CNS signs. Viral antigen was first detected immunohistochemically in the lumbar spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion ipsilateral to the inoculated leg; it was detected later in the pyramidal cells of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, and in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum but not in the ependymal cells, choroid plexus cells or other glial cells. The infected neurons showed no cytopathological changes.

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Accession: 049677628

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PMID: 14693125


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