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Occupational and non-occupational risk factors in bladder cancer patients in an industrialized area located in former East-Germany



Occupational and non-occupational risk factors in bladder cancer patients in an industrialized area located in former East-Germany



Aktuelle Urologie 36(5): 417-422



Several occupational carcinogens are metabolized by polymorphic enzymes. The distribution of the polymorphic enzymes N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2; substrates: aromatic amines), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1; substrates: e. g., reactive metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1; substrates: small molecules with 1 - 2 carbon atoms) were investigated. At the urological department in Lutherstadt Wittenberg, 136 patients with a histologically proven transitional cell cancer of the urinary bladder were investigated for all occupations performed for more than 6 months. Several occupational and non-occupational risk factors were asked. The genotypes of NAT2, GSTM1, and GSTT1 were determined from leucocyte DNA by PCR. Compared to the general population in Middle Europe, the percentage of GSTT1 negative persons (22.1 %) was ordinary; the percentage of slow acetylators (59.6 %) was in the upper normal range, while the percentage of GSTM1 negative persons (58.8 %) was elevated in the entire group. Shifts in the distribution of the genotypes were observed in subgroups who had been exposed to asbestos (6/6 GSTM1 negative, 5/6 slow acetylators), rubber manufacturing (8/10 GSTM1 negative), and chlorinated solvents (9/15 GSTM1 negative). The overrepresentation of GSTM1 negative bladder cancer patients also in this industrialized area and more pronounced in several occupationally exposed subgroups points to an impact of the GSTM1 negative genotype in bladder carcinogenesis.

Accession: 049739540

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 16163604

DOI: 10.1055/s-2004-830260


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