+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Superiority of synchrony of 256-slice cone beam computed tomography for acquiring pulsating objects. Comparison with conventional multislice computed tomography



Superiority of synchrony of 256-slice cone beam computed tomography for acquiring pulsating objects. Comparison with conventional multislice computed tomography



International Journal of Cardiology 118(3): 400-405



A prototype 256-slice cone beam computed tomography (CT) provides complete volumetric data within a single gantry rotation (1 s/rotation) with 0.5 mm slice-thickness. Calcified phantoms (200-400 HU) were attached to the balloon of a pulsating phantom and moved at a rate of 5-90/min. Acquisition was performed during one to-and-fro motion at each pulsation rate without electrocardiogram (ECG)-gating. Each period was divided into 10 phases, and compared to conventional multislice CT scanning without ECG-gating. At 5-20/min, the configuration of calcified phantoms continued to the through-plane without gaps. At 60/min, duplicated calcified phantoms at end-systole and end-diastole were observed without motion. At 90/min, motion could be observed without gaps but was more blurred, and total calcified volume, Agatston scores, mean and max CT values of three phantoms were almost equal compared with those at static state. However, at 60/min, total calcified volume, scores, mean and max CT values of three phantoms were decreased to 64%, 37%, 80% and 56%, respectively, compared with those at static state. In multislice CT, even at lower rates, there were gaps in the through-plane. At 60/min, total calcified volume, scores, mean and max CT values of three phantoms were decreased to only 8%, 3%, 79% and 53%, respectively, compared with static state. This new prototype's unique character (synchrony) enables the acquisition of pulsating objects. These can be acquired without gaps in the through-plane even in the absence of ECG-gating. However, its present temporal resolution only permits accurate quantitative evaluation of calcium up to 20/min.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 050451254

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17052785

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2006.07.104


Related references

Dose and image quality of cone-beam computed tomography as compared with conventional multislice computed tomography in abdominal imaging. Investigative Radiology 49(10): 675-684, 2014

Cone beam computed tomography for imaging orbital trauma--image quality and radiation dose compared with conventional multislice computed tomography. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 52(1): 76-80, 2014

Radiation exposure during midfacial imaging using 4- and 16-slice computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography systems and conventional radiography. Dento Maxillo Facial Radiology 33(2): 83-86, 2004

Morphologic examination of the temporal bone by cone beam computed tomography: comparison with multislice helical computed tomography. European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Diseases 128(5): 230-235, 2011

Comparison of cone-beam computed tomography with multislice computed tomography in detection of small osseous condylar defects. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 150(1): 130-139, 2016

Comparison of gray values of cone-beam computed tomography with hounsfield units of multislice computed tomography: An in vitro study. Indian Journal of Dental Research 28(1): 66-70, 2018

Limited cone-beam computed tomography imaging of the middle ear: a comparison with multislice helical computed tomography. Acta Radiologica 48(2): 207-212, 2007

Comparison of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Multislice Computed Tomography in the Assessment of Extremity Fractures. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography 43(3): 372-378, 2019

Comparison of radiation dose for implant imaging using conventional spiral tomography, computed tomography, and cone-beam computed tomography. Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics 107(4): 559-565, 2009

Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and multislice computed tomography in diagnostic accuracy of maxillofacial fractures in dried human skull: an in vitro study. Dental Traumatology 30(2): 162-168, 2014

Comparison of Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Multi-slice Spiral Computed Tomography Bone Density Measurements in the Maxilla and Mandible. New York State Dental Journal 81(4): 42-45, 2015

Comparison of Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Multi Slice Computed Tomography Image Quality of Human Dried Mandible using 10 Anatomical Landmarks. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research 11(2): Zc13-Zc16, 2017

Comparison of simulated cone beam computed tomography to conventional helical computed tomography for imaging of rhinosinusitis. Laryngoscope 124(9): 2002-2006, 2014

High-resolution cone-beam computed tomography for assessment of bone invasion in oral cancer: Comparison with conventional computed tomography. Head and Neck 39(10): 2016-2020, 2017

Comparison of cone-beam and conventional multislice computed tomography for image-guided dental implant planning. Clinical Oral Investigations 17(1): 317-324, 2013