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Are only serum creatinine levels good enough for detecting acute kidney injury?



Are only serum creatinine levels good enough for detecting acute kidney injury?



European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery 34(2): 467-468




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Accession: 051628652

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 18524616

DOI: 10.1016/j.ejcts.2008.04.033


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