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Aspects of tests and assessment of filtering materials used for respiratory protection against bioaerosols. Part I: type of active substance, contact time, microorganism species



Aspects of tests and assessment of filtering materials used for respiratory protection against bioaerosols. Part I: type of active substance, contact time, microorganism species



International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics 16(2): 263-273



This paper presents the results of a study on antimicrobial activity of polymer filter nonwovens produced by needle-punching or melt-blowing with an addition of disinfecting agents. The first part of the paper discusses how the biocidal activity of nonwovens is a function of the active agent added to the nonwovens, the duration of the contact of microorganisms with nonwovens and the type of microorganisms. The types of fibres and disinfecting agents had a considerable effect on the biocidal activity of nonwovens. The biocidal effect of nonwovens increased with the duration of their contact with microorganisms. Fibre activity differed considerably depending on the species of the microorganism. The microorganisms most sensitive to biocidal activity of the active filter nonwoven were S. aureus, M. flavus and E. coli. There were no biocidal effects on spore-forming bacterium B. subtilis.

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Accession: 051646697

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 20540844

DOI: 10.1080/10803548.2010.11076841



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