+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Attitudes about the VA health-care setting, mental illness, and mental health treatment and their relationship with VA mental health service use among female and male OEF/OIF veterans



Attitudes about the VA health-care setting, mental illness, and mental health treatment and their relationship with VA mental health service use among female and male OEF/OIF veterans



Psychological Services 12(1): 49-58



In the present study, the authors explored gender differences in attitudinal barriers to and facilitators of care for Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans and examined the relationship of those factors with VA mental health service use among female and male veterans with probable mental health conditions. Data were collected as part of a national cross-sectional survey of OEF/OIF veterans; the current sample was limited to participants with a probable diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, or alcohol abuse (N = 278). Although negligible gender differences were observed in attitudes about VA care and perceived fit in the VA setting, men reported slightly more negative beliefs about mental illness and mental health treatment than women. In addition, logistic regressions revealed different associations with VA mental health service use for women and men. For women only, positive perceptions of VA care were associated with increased likelihood of seeking mental health treatment. For men only, perceived similarity to other VA care users and negative beliefs about mental health treatment were associated with increased likelihood of service use, whereas negative beliefs about mental illness were associated with lower likelihood of service use. For both women and men, perceived entitlement to VA care was associated with increased likelihood of service use and negative beliefs about treatment-seeking were associated with a reduced likelihood of seeking mental health care in the past 6 months. Results support the need for tailored outreach to address unique barriers to mental health treatment for female and male OEF/OIF veterans.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 051709827

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 25365245

DOI: 10.1037/a0038269


Related references

The effectiveness of mental health-related theoretical education and clinical placement in mental health settings in changing the attitudes of health care students towards mental illness: A systematic review. Jbi Library of Systematic Reviews 10(58): 4019-4076, 2012

Mental health of those directly exposed to the World Trade Center disaster: unmet mental health care need, mental health treatment service use, and quality of life. Social Science and Medicine 81: 110-114, 2013

The interdependence of mental health service systems: the effects of VA mental health funding on veterans' use of state mental health inpatient facilities. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics 3(2): 61-67, 2000

Benefits of a primary care clinic co-located and integrated in a mental health setting for veterans with serious mental illness. Preventing Chronic Disease 9: E51, 2012

A survey of perceived barriers and attitudes toward mental health care among OEF/OIF veterans at VA outpatient mental health clinics. Military Medicine 179(3): 273-278, 2014

Treatment of Women Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Serious Mental Illness in an Inpatient Mental Health Treatment Setting: A Case Study. Women & Therapy 38(1-2): 128-140, 2015

Veterans Affairs Health System and mental health treatment retention among patients with serious mental illness: evaluating accessibility and availability barriers. Health Services Research 42(3 Pt 1): 1042-1060, 2007

Mental health nursing and physical health care: a cross-sectional study of nurses' attitudes, practice, and perceived training needs for the physical health care of people with severe mental illness. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing 22(5): 409-417, 2013

Mental health nurses' attitudes towards the physical health care of people with severe and enduring mental illness: the development of a measurement tool. International Journal of Nursing Studies 49(1): 72-83, 2012

Outpatient care use among female veterans: differences between mental health and non-mental health users. Military Medicine 167(1): 10-13, 2002

The Evolution of Mental Health/Illness Services || Changing Health Beliefs on Causations of Mental Illness and Their Impacts on Family Burdens and the Mental Health of Chinese Caregivers in Hong Kong. International Journal of Mental Health 32(2): 84-98, 2003

Attitudes towards mental health and the integration of mental health services into primary health care: a cross-sectional survey among health-care workers in Lvea Em District, Cambodia. Global Health Action 10(1): 1331579, 2017

Sexual assault, mental health, and service use among male and female veterans seen in Veterans Affairs primary care clinics: a multi-site study. Psychiatry Research 159(1-2): 226-236, 2008

Providing Treatment to Persons with Mental Illness || Local Mental Health Authorities and Service System Change: Evidence from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Program on Chronic Mental Illness. The Milbank Quarterly 72(1): 49-80, 1994

Market Madness and Mental Illness: The Crisis in Mental Health Care2 || Privately Managed Mental Health Care: Shrinking Services. International Journal of Mental Health 27(2): 3-51, 1998