EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Candida species distribution and antifungal susceptibility testing according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and new vs. old Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute clinical breakpoints: a 6-year prospective candidaemia survey from the fungal infection network of Switzerland



Candida species distribution and antifungal susceptibility testing according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and new vs. old Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute clinical breakpoints: a 6-year prospective candidaemia survey from the fungal infection network of Switzerland



Clinical Microbiology and Infection 20(7): 698-705



We analyzed the species distribution of Candida blood isolates (CBIs), prospectively collected between 2004 and 2009 within FUNGINOS, and compared their antifungal susceptibility according to clinical breakpoints defined by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) in 2013, and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) in 2008 (old CLSI breakpoints) and 2012 (new CLSI breakpoints). CBIs were tested for susceptiblity to fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin by microtitre broth dilution (Sensititre® YeastOne™ test panel). Of 1090 CBIs, 675 (61.9%) were C. albicans, 191 (17.5%) C. glabrata, 64 (5.9%) C. tropicalis, 59 (5.4%) C. parapsilosis, 33 (3%) C. dubliniensis, 22 (2%) C. krusei and 46 (4.2%) rare Candida species. Independently of the breakpoints applied, C. albicans was almost uniformly (>98%) susceptible to all three antifungal agents. In contrast, the proportions of fluconazole- and voriconazole-susceptible C. tropicalis and F-susceptible C. parapsilosis were lower according to EUCAST/new CLSI breakpoints than to the old CLSI breakpoints. For caspofungin, non-susceptibility occurred mainly in C. krusei (63.3%) and C. glabrata (9.4%). Nine isolates (five C. tropicalis, three C. albicans and one C. parapsilosis) were cross-resistant to azoles according to EUCAST breakpoints, compared with three isolates (two C. albicans and one C. tropicalis) according to new and two (2 C. albicans) according to old CLSI breakpoints. Four species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis) represented >90% of all CBIs. In vitro resistance to fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin was rare among C. albicans, but an increase of non-susceptibile isolates was observed among C. tropicalis/C. parapsilosis for the azoles and C. glabrata/C. krusei for caspofungin according to EUCAST and new CLSI breakpoints compared with old CLSI breakpoints.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 051927481

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 24188136

DOI: 10.1111/1469-0691.12440



Related references

Development of interpretive breakpoints for antifungal susceptibility testing: conceptual framework and analysis of in vitro-in vivo correlation data for fluconazole, itraconazole, and candida infections. Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. Clinical Infectious Diseases 24(2): 235-247, 1997

Susceptibility to echinocandins of Candida spp. strains isolated in Italy assessed by European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methods. Bmc Microbiology 15(): 106-106, 2016

Clinical and laboratory standards institute versus European committee for antimicrobial susceptibility testing guidelines for interpretation of carbapenem antimicrobial susceptibility results for Escherichia coli in urinary tract infection (UTI). Journal of Laboratory Physicians 10(3): 289-293, 2018

Comparison of the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility system with the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Broth Microdilution Reference Methods and with the Sensititre YeastOne and Etest techniques for in vitro detection of antifungal resistance in yeast isolates. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 48(5): 1782-1786, 2010

Evaluation by data mining techniques of fluconazole breakpoints established by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and comparison with those of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 54(4): 1541-1546, 2010

Comparison of carbapenem breakpoints in Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines on antibiotic susceptibility test reporting of Acinetobacter baumannii. Indian Journal of Pathology & Microbiology 59(3): 429-430, 2016

Comparison of Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution methods for determining the susceptibilities of Candida isolates. Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni 52(1): 35-48, 2018

Frequency of voriconazole resistance in vitro among Spanish clinical isolates of Candida spp. According to breakpoints established by the Antifungal Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 55(4): 1794-1797, 2011

Pre-clinical development of antifungal susceptibility test methods for the testing of the novel antifungal agent E1210 versus Candida: comparison of CLSI and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing methods. Journal of Antimicrobial ChemoTherapy 66(11): 2581-2584, 2012

Comparison of the broth microdilution methods of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for testing itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole against Aspergillus isolates. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 49(3): 1110-1112, 2011

Comparison of Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines for the interpretation of antibiotic susceptibility at a University teaching hospital in Nairobi, Kenya: a cross-sectional study. Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials 15(): 21-21, 2016

Comparison of the broth microdilution (BMD) method of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute BMD method for non-Candida albicans and non-C. tropicalis bloodstream isolates from eleven tertiary hospitals in São Paulo state, Brazil. Fems Yeast Research 12(8): 890-896, 2013

Multicenter evaluation of the reproducibility of the proposed antifungal susceptibility testing method for fermentative yeasts of the Antifungal Susceptibility Testing Subcommittee of the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (AFST-EUCAST). Clinical Microbiology and Infection 9(6): 467-474, 2003

Progress in antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida spp. by use of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methods, 2010 to 2012. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 50(9): 2846-2856, 2013

Comparison of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and Etest methods with the CLSI broth microdilution method for echinocandin susceptibility testing of Candida species. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 48(5): 1592-1599, 2010