+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Characterization of a synergistic interaction between two cucurbit-infecting begomoviruses: Squash leaf curl virus and Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus



Characterization of a synergistic interaction between two cucurbit-infecting begomoviruses: Squash leaf curl virus and Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus



Phytopathology 101(2): 281-289



Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) and Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV) are cucurbit-infecting bipartite begomoviruses. Both viruses are found in the eastern Mediterranean basin but the effects of dual infection of both viruses on melon (Cucumis melo L.) have not been described. 'Arava' melon plants were inoculated in the greenhouse, using whiteflies, with either SLCV, WmCSV, or both. Control plants were exposed to nonviruliferous whiteflies or not exposed at all. Following inoculation, plants were transplanted to a 50-mesh insect-proof nethouse and grown until fruit maturity. The experiment was performed in two melon-growing seasons: spring, transplant in May and harvest in July; and summer, transplant in August and harvest in October. Following inoculation, SLCV-infected melon plants showed mild symptoms that disappeared with time, and there was no effect on plant height. WmCSV-infected plants developed disease symptoms that became more obvious with time, and plants were somewhat shorter than control plants in the spring but not in the summer. SLCV had no effect on yield, regardless of season. WmCSV had no statistically significant effect on yield in the spring but, in the summer, reduced yield by 22%, on average. Dual-inoculated plants showed a synergistic interaction between the two viruses. They developed disease symptoms that were more pronounced than WmCSV alone, with plants being shorter than control plants by 20 to 25% regardless of season. Moreover, the yield of dual-inoculated plants was reduced on average by 21% in the spring and 54% in the summer, and fruit appearance was adversely affected. Dual inoculation did not affect WmCSV DNA level but SLCV DNA level was increased several-fold by the presence of WmCSV.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 052030166

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 21219130

DOI: 10.1094/PHYTO-06-10-0159


Related references

Watermelon chlorotic stunt and Squash leaf curl begomoviruses-New threats to cucurbit crops in the Middle East. Israel Journal of Plant Sciences 58(1): 33-42, 2010

First Report on the Association of Squash leaf curl virus and Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus with Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Disease. Plant Disease 97(3): 428, 2019

Analysis of watermelon chlorotic stunt virus and tomato leaf curl Palampur virus mixed and pseudo-recombination infections. Virus Genes 51(3): 408-416, 2016

Quantification and localization of Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Geminiviridae) in populations of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera, Aleyrodidae) with differential virus transmission characteristics. Plos One 9(11): E111968, 2015

Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus: characterization and differential reassortment with closest relatives reveal adaptive virulence in the squash leaf curl virus clade and host shifting by the host-restricted bean calico mosaic virus. Journal of Virology 82(4): 1959-1967, 2007

First report of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus in California and Arizona, in association with Cucurbit leaf crumple virus and Squash leaf curl virus. Plant Disease 91(3): 330, 2007

First Report of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus in California and Arizona, in Association with Cucurbit leaf crumple virus and Squash leaf curl virus. Plant Disease 91(3): 330, 2007

Phylogenetic analysis of Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus from Guatemala: another emergent species in the Squash leaf curl virus clade. Virus Research 158(1-2): 257-262, 2011

First Report of Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus Infecting Watermelon in Saudi Arabia. Plant Disease 98(10): 1451, 2019

Emergence of a New Cucurbit-Infecting Begomovirus Species Capable of Forming Viable Reassortants with Related Viruses in the Squash leaf curl virus Cluster. Phytopathology 92(7): 734-742, 2008

Characterization of Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus: Phylogeny and differential intermolecular reassortment with begomoviruses in the SLCV clad. Phytopathology 95(6): S70-S71, 2005

Infectious clones of Cucurbit leaf curl virus and viable reassortants with squash leaf curl viruses. Phytopathology 91(6 Supplement): S11, 2001

First Report of Cucurbit chlorotic yellows virus Infecting Cucumber, Melon, and Squash in Iran. Plant Disease 97(7): 1005, 2019

Characterization and occurrence of squash chlorotic leaf spot virus, a tentative new torradovirus infecting cucurbits in Sudan. Archives of Virology 161(6): 1651-1655, 2017

Squash leaf curl virus (SqLCV) and other begomoviruses in Saudi Arabia. Dirasat Agricultural Sciences 29(1): 28-36, 2002