+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Clinical practice characteristics of osteopathic and allopathic primary care physicians at academic health centers: results from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey



Clinical practice characteristics of osteopathic and allopathic primary care physicians at academic health centers: results from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey



Academic Medicine 84(6): 744-750



To explore characteristics of patient visits to osteopathic physicians (DOs) and allopathic physicians (MDs) in the provision of ambulatory primary care services at academic health centers (AHCs) relative to non-AHC sites. Physicians report patient visits to the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS). The authors used NAMCS data (2002-2006) to statistically estimate, characterize, and compare patient visits of four physician provider type- and AHC site-specific subgroups: DOs and MDs at non-AHC sites, and DOs and MDs at AHC sites. The 134,369 patient visits reported in the NAMCS database represented 4.57 billion physician office visits after the authors applied patient weights. These visits included 2.03 billion primary care patient visits (205.1 million DO visits and 1.77 billion MD visits at non-AHC sites; 5.8 million DO visits and 52.3 million MD visits at AHC sites). Practicing at an AHC site appeared to change the dynamic of the patient visit to an osteopathic physician. Most notably, these changes involved patient demographics (sex), patient visit context (practice metropolitan statistical area status, patient symptom chronicity, and injury as reason for the visit), and medical management (diagnostic testing, frequency and intensity of ordering drugs, and use of osteopathic manipulative treatment). Evidence suggests that osteopathic physicians in community, non-AHC settings offer a more distinctive osteopathic approach to primary care than osteopathic physicians at AHC sites, which both indicates a need for further research to explain this phenomenon and has potentially important implications for osteopathic medical education.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 052126318

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19474550

DOI: 10.1097/acm.0b013e3181a424fc


Related references

A comparison of patient visits to osteopathic and allopathic general and family medicine physicians: results from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2003-2004. Osteopathic Medicine and Primary Care 1: 2, 2007

Drug utilization in general and family practice by characteristics of physicians and office visits: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1980. Advance Data 1983(87): 1-12, 1983

Patient characteristics and clinical management of patients with shoulder pain in U.S. primary care settings: secondary data analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Bmc Musculoskeletal Disorders 6: 4, 2005

PSA testing utilization by urologists and primary care physicians Data from the 2000 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Journal of Urology 171(4 Suppl.): 34, 2004

Drug utilization in office visits to primary care physicians: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1980. Advance Data 1982(86): 1-16, 1982

Health care of adolescents by office-based physicians: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1980-81. Advance Data 1984(99): 1-11, 1984

Comorbidity of rosacea and depression: an analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey--Outpatient Department data collected by the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics from 1995 to 2002. British Journal of Dermatology 153(6): 1176-1181, 2005

Dizziness in primary care. Results from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Journal of Family Practice 29(1): 33-38, 1989

Anxiety and unrecognized high blood pressure in U.S. ambulatory care settings: an analysis of the 2005 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 38(1): 91, 2008

Statutory ambulatory medical care through the eyes of the health insurance beneficiaries--methods and results of the 2006 NASHIP Health Insurance Beneficiary survey: care utilisation, primary care, and emergency medical services. Gesundheitswesen ) 71(2): 94, 2009

Effects of Managed Care on the Length of Time That Elderly Patients Spend with Physicians during Ambulatory Visits: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Medical Care 40(7): 606-613, 2002

Effects of managed care on the length of time that elderly patients spend with physicians during ambulatory visits: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Medical Care 40(7): 606-613, 2002

Awareness and use of osteopathic physicians in the United States: results of the Second Osteopathic Survey of Health Care in America (OSTEOSURV-II). Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 103(6): 281-289, 2003

Hypertension screening in children and adolescents--National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, United States, 2007-2010. Mmwr Suppl.s 63(2): 47-53, 2014

Using National Medical Care Survey data to validate examination content on a performance-based clinical skills assessment for osteopathic physicians. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 103(5): 225-231, 2003