+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Comparative study for the presence of enterococcal virulence factors gelatinase, hemolysin and biofilm among clinical and commensal isolates of enterococcus faecalis



Comparative study for the presence of enterococcal virulence factors gelatinase, hemolysin and biofilm among clinical and commensal isolates of enterococcus faecalis



Journal of Laboratory Physicians 2(2): 100-104



Biofilm production, gelatinase and hemolysin are the potential virulence factors of Enterococci. Gelatinase and hemolysin producing strains of Enterococcus Faecalis have been shown to cause severe infections in animal models. Biofilm production has been shown to enhance the persistence of E. faecalis in urinary bladder and other medical indwelling devices infections. To compare the presence of gelatinase, hemolysin and biofilm formation among clinical and commensal isolates and to study the co-relation between virulence factors with respect to different clinical specimens. During the study period of 2 years from July 2004 to July 2006, 200 clinical isolates from nosocomial infections and 100 commensal isolates of E. faecalis were taken for the study. The clinical and commensal isolates were tested for the presence of gelatinase, hemolysin and biofilm and compared. The presence of these virulence factors among different clinical isolates was also studied. Chi-square and likelihood ratio analysis were carried out using SSPS version 5.1 software. The clinical isolates produced 39, 16.5 and 32.5% of gelatinase, hemolysin and biofilm, respectively, as compared to 31, 19 and 16% produced by the commensal isolates, respectively. Endotracheal tube infection, urinary tract infection, umbilical catheter tip infected isolates produced 60.8, 86.6 and 100% biofilm, respectively. Significant difference in the production of biofilm (P<0.001) was noted between clinical and commensal isolates. Organism isolated from medically indwelling devices produced high amount of biofilm, confirming its role in colonization and causing nosocomial infections.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 052217169

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 21346906

DOI: 10.4103/0974-2727.72159


Related references

Association between the presence of enterococcal virulence factors gelatinase, hemolysin, and enterococcal surface protein and mortality among patients with bacteremia due to Enterococcus faecalis. Clinical Infectious Diseases 35(5): 570-575, 2002

Relationship between biofilm formation, the enterococcal surface protein (Esp) and gelatinase in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Fems Microbiology Letters 256(1): 145-150, 2006

Comparative study among clinical and commensal isolates of Enterococcus faecalis for presence of esp gene and biofilm production. Journal of Infection in Developing Countries 5(5): 365-369, 2011

Virulence factors, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance pattern in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolated from clinical and commensal human samples in Isfahan, Iran. Annali di Igiene 31(2): 154-164, 2019

Comparative genomic analysis for the presence of potential enterococcal virulence factors in the probiotic Enterococcus faecalis strain Symbioflor 1. International Journal of Medical Microbiology 297(7-8): 533-539, 2007

Characteristics of and Virulence Factors Associated with Biofilm Formation in Clinical Enterococcus faecalis Isolates in China. Frontiers in Microbiology 8: 2338, 2017

Virulence factors in clinical and commensal isolates of Enterococcus species. Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 56(1): 24-30, 2013

Characterization of Enterococcus faecalis isolates originating from different sources for their virulence factors and genes, antibiotic resistance patterns, genotypes and biofilm production. Iranian Journal of Veterinary Research 16(3): 261-266, 2016

Lack of correlation of gelatinase production and biofilm formation in a large collection of Enterococcus faecalis isolates. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 43(10): 5405-5407, 2005

Uncommitted role of enterococcal surface protein, Esp, and origin of isolates on biofilm production by Enterococcus faecalis isolated from bovine mastitis. Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection 46(2): 80-84, 2013

Factors of virulence and mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium with high-level gentamicin resistance. Epidemiologie, Mikrobiologie, Imunologie 54(2): 65-74, 2005

High Incidence of Virulence Factors Among Clinical Enterococcus faecalis Isolates in Southwestern Iran. Infection and ChemoTherapy 49(1): 51-56, 2017

Differences in biofilm formation and virulence factors between clinical and fecal enterococcal isolates of human and animal origin. Microbial Pathogenesis 52(6): 336-343, 2012

Enterococcus faecalis from Food, Clinical Specimens, and Oral Sites: Prevalence of Virulence Factors in Association with Biofilm Formation. Frontiers in Microbiology 6: 1534, 2016

Virulence factors of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium blood culture isolates. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 19(1): 39-42, 2000