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Comparative study of peripheral blood smear and quantitative buffy coat in malaria diagnosis



Comparative study of peripheral blood smear and quantitative buffy coat in malaria diagnosis



Journal of Communicable Diseases 43(1): 57-59



A rapid test for diagnosis of malaria based on acridine orange staining of centrifuged blood samples in a microhaematocrit tube (QBC) was compared with Leishman stained thin peripheral blood smear in 287 samples. Malaria was diagnosed in 44 patients by Leishman staining technique and in 65 patients by QBC method. The QBC method allowed detection of an additional 21 cases. Thus the prevalence rate of malaria during the study was 22.65%. In 222 Patients who were negative by the QBC technique, the Leishman stained smears were also negative for malarial parasite. Although QBC method was superior to the smear for malarial parasite detection, species identification was difficult by this technique. The QBC method provides a reliable, quick, easily mastered, accurate method for diagnosis of malaria. The QBC system can also be used in the diagnosis of other parasitic diseases from blood (Filariasis). However, Leishman stained thin blood film still appear superior for species identification.

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Accession: 052218199

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PMID: 23785883


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