+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Controversy: Does repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation/ transcranial direct current stimulation show efficacy in treating tinnitus patients?



Controversy: Does repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation/ transcranial direct current stimulation show efficacy in treating tinnitus patients?



Brain Stimulation 1(3): 192-205



Tinnitus affects 10% of the population, its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, and treatment is elusive. Functional imaging has demonstrated a relationship between the intensity of tinnitus and the degree of reorganization in the auditory cortex. Experimental studies have further shown that tinnitus is associated with synchronized hyperactivity in the auditory cortex. Therefore, targeted modulation of auditory cortex has been proposed as a new therapeutic approach for chronic tinnitus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are noninvasive methods that can modulate cortical activity. These techniques have been applied in different ways in patients with chronic tinnitus. Single sessions of high-frequency rTMS over the temporal cortex have been successful in reducing the intensity of tinnitus during the time of stimulation and could be predictive for treatment outcome of chronic epidural stimulation using implanted electrodes. Another approach that uses rTMS as a treatment for tinnitus is application of low-frequency rTMS in repeated sessions, to induce a lasting change of neuronal activity in the auditory cortex beyond the duration of stimulation. Beneficial effects of this treatment have been consistently demonstrated in several small controlled studies. However, results are characterized by high interindividual variability and only a moderate decrease of the tinnitus. The role of patient-related (for example, hearing loss, tinnitus duration, age) and stimulation-related (for example, stimulation site, stimulation protocols) factors still remains to be elucidated. Even in this early stage of investigation, there is a convincing body of evidence that rTMS represents a promising tool for pathophysiological assessment and therapeutic management of tinnitus. Further development of this technique will depend on a more detailed understanding of the neurobiological effects mediating the benefit of TMS on tinnitus perception. Moreover clinical studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are needed.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 052338121

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 20633385

DOI: 10.1016/j.brs.2008.06.003


Related references

Controversy: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation shows efficacy in treating psychiatric diseases (depression, mania, schizophrenia, obsessive-complusive disorder, panic, posttraumatic stress disorder). Brain Stimulation 2(1): 14-21, 2010

Efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treating fibromyalgia syndrome: a systematic review. Pain Practice 13(2): 131-145, 2013

Transient tinnitus suppression induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. European Journal of Neurology 13(9): 996-1001, 2006

Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation/transcranial direct current stimulation in cognitive neurorehabilitation. Brain Stimulation 1(4): 326-336, 2010

The effects of combined repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation on motor function in patients with stroke. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience 34(6): 915-923, 2016

Comparison of two protocols of transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of chronic tinnitus: a randomized controlled clinical trial of burst repetitive versus high-frequency repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. Neurological Sciences 35(2): 227-232, 2014

Pressure pain thresholds increase after preconditioning 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation. Plos One 9(3): E92540, 2015

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation in motor rehabilitation after stroke: an update. Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 58(4): 220-224, 2016

The use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to relieve pain. Brain Stimulation 1(4): 337-344, 2010

Transcranial direct current stimulation priming of therapeutic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a pilot study. Journal of Ect 25(4): 256-260, 2010

Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates motor responses evoked by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Neuroscience Letters 522(2): 167-171, 2012

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) priming of 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pain thresholds. Neuroscience Letters 534: 289-294, 2013

Transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in consultation-liaison psychiatry. Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research 46(10): 815-823, 2015

Transcranial direct current stimulation preconditioning modulates the effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the human motor cortex. European Journal of Neuroscience 35(1): 119-124, 2012

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct-current stimulation in neuropathic pain due to radiculopathy: a randomized sham-controlled comparative study. Pain 157(6): 1224-1231, 2017