EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Dietary intake of micronutrients and the risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer risk


Cancer Causes & Control 22(3): 469-478
Dietary intake of micronutrients and the risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer risk
We aimed to investigate the effect of dietary intake of micronutrients that are metabolized and excreted via the urinary tract on bladder cancer risk. A semi-quantitative 322 item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to collect dietary data from 200 bladder cancer cases and 386 control subjects participating in the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer risk. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, smoking characteristics, occupational exposures, and energy intake. We observed a positive association between calcium intake and bladder cancer (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.00-3.15; p-trend = 0.049) and increased odds, although not statistically significant, for highest tertile of phosphorus intake (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 0.95-3.49; p-trend = 0.06). We identified possible modification of the effects of both calcium and phosphorus by level of magnesium intake. Increased odds of bladder cancer were also observed for participants with highest intake of phosphorus and lowest intake of vitamin D (OR: 4.25; 95% CI: 1.44-12.55) and among older participants with the highest intakes of calcium (OR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.08-3.36) and phosphorus (OR: 2.02; 95% CI: 1.05-3.92). The positive associations we observed between bladder cancer and intake of calcium and phosphorus require confirmation by other studies. The balances between inter-related micronutrients also warrant further examination.

(PDF same-day service: $19.90)

Accession: 052597527

PMID: 21203820

DOI: 10.1007/s10552-010-9718-z



Related references

Consumption of animal products, olive oil and dietary fat and results from the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer risk. European Journal of Cancer 47(3): 436-442, 2011

Fluid intake and the risk of bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case-control study on bladder cancer. International Journal of Cancer 127(3): 638-645, 2010

Does occupational exposure to PAHs, diesel and aromatic amines interact with smoking and metabolic genetic polymorphisms to increase the risk on bladder cancer?; The Belgian case control study on bladder cancer risk. Cancer Letters 245(1-2): 51-60, 2006

Fruit consumption reduces the effect of smoking on bladder cancer risk. The Belgian case control study on bladder cancer. International Journal of Cancer 118(10): 2572-2578, 2005

Selenium is inversely associated with bladder cancer risk: a report from the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer. International Journal of Urology 13(9): 1180-1184, 2006

Bladder cancer and occupation: a report from the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer risk. American Journal of Industrial Medicine 50(6): 449-454, 2007

Dietary consumption and diet diversity and risk of developing bladder cancer: results from the South and East China case-control study. Cancer Causes & Control 24(5): 885-895, 2014

Dietary water intake and bladder cancer risk: An Italian case-control study. Cancer Epidemiology 45(): 151-156, 2016

Validation of the IMMIDIET food frequency questionnaire in an adult Belgian population: a report from the Belgian case-control study on bladder cancer risk. Acta Clinica Belgica 66(1): 18-25, 2011

Intake of α-linolenic acid and other fatty acids in relation to the risk of bladder cancer: results from the New Hampshire case-control study. British Journal of Nutrition 106(7): 1070-1077, 2011