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Differences in whole-body fat oxidation kinetics between cycling and running



Differences in whole-body fat oxidation kinetics between cycling and running



European Journal of Applied Physiology 109(6): 1037-1045



This study aimed to quantitatively describe and compare whole-body fat oxidation kinetics in cycling and running using a sinusoidal mathematical model (SIN). Thirteen moderately trained individuals (7 men and 6 women) performed two graded exercise tests, with 3-min stages and 1 km h(-1) (or 20 W) increment, on a treadmill and on a cycle ergometer. Fat oxidation rates were determined using indirect calorimetry and plotted as a function of exercise intensity. The SIN model, which includes three independent variables (dilatation, symmetry and translation) that account for main quantitative characteristics of kinetics, provided a mathematical description of fat oxidation kinetics and allowed for determination of the intensity (Fat(max)) that elicits maximal fat oxidation (MFO). While the mean fat oxidation kinetics in cycling formed a symmetric parabolic curve, the mean kinetics during running was characterized by a greater dilatation (i.e., widening of the curve, P < 0.001) and a rightward asymmetry (i.e., shift of the peak of the curve to higher intensities, P = 0.01). Fat(max) was significantly higher in running compared with cycling (P < 0.001), whereas MFO was not significantly different between modes of exercise (P = 0.36). This study showed that the whole-body fat oxidation kinetics during running was characterized by a greater dilatation and a rightward asymmetry compared with cycling. The greater dilatation may be mainly related to the larger muscle mass involved in running while the rightward asymmetry may be induced by the specific type of muscle contraction.

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Accession: 052604015

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 20358219

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-010-1443-5


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