+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Effect of rate of body weight gain of steers during the stocker phase. II. Visceral organ mass and body composition of growing-finishing beef cattle



Effect of rate of body weight gain of steers during the stocker phase. II. Visceral organ mass and body composition of growing-finishing beef cattle



Journal of Animal Science 91(5): 2355-2366



Two experiments were conducted to examine the effect of rate of BW gain during the stocker phase on visceral organ mass and body composition of growing-finishing cattle that had grazed dormant native range (DNR) or winter wheat pasture (WP). In each experiment, fall-weaned steers were allotted randomly to 1 of these stocker production programs: 1) control, 1.02 kg · steer(-1) · d(-1) of a 40% CP cottonseed meal-based supplement during grazing of DNR (CON); 2) corn/soybean meal-based supplement fed at 1% of BW during grazing of DNR (CORN); 3) grazing WP at a high stocking rate to achieve a reduced rate of BW gain (LGWP); and 4) grazing WP at a low stocking rate to achieve an increased rate of BW gain (HGWP). In Exp. 1, 3 steers per treatment were harvested after winter grazing (138 d). The remaining WP steers were transitioned into a finishing phase and DNR steers were allowed to graze the same pastures for another 115 d before entering a feedyard. In Exp. 2, steers grazed respective pastures until each treatment reached an estimated HCW of 200 kg (262, 180, 142, and 74 d, respectively, for CON, CORN, LGWP, and HGWP treatments), at which time 4 steers per treatment were randomly selected for intermediate harvest before finishing. At the end of the finishing period, 4 additional steers from each treatment were randomly selected for final carcass measurements. All steers were fed to a common 12th rib fat thickness of 1.27 cm. After winter grazing in Exp. 1, HGWP steers had the greatest (P < 0.01) mesenteric/omental fat, total viscera, total splanchnic tissue mass, and carcass and empty body fat, compared with the other treatments. In Exp. 2 at intermediate harvest, WP steers had greater (P < 0.03) mesenteric/omental fat, total viscera, and total splanchnic tissue mass, compared with CORN steers, with CON steers being intermediate. Also, the WP steers had greater (P < 0.02) carcass and empty body fat, compared with CORN steers, with CON steers being intermediate. At final harvest in Exp. 2, LGWP steers had the least total viscera and total splanchnic tissue mass, compared with the other treatments. However, there were no differences (P > 0.53) among treatments for carcass or empty body fat. Stocker systems using WP or DNR result in cattle with differences in body fat and visceral organ mass before finishing; this may influence feedlot efficiency, even though there were no differences in body fat and visceral organ mass at the end of the finishing period.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 052825443

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 23463558

DOI: 10.2527/jas.2012-5451


Related references

Effect of rate of body weight gain in steers during the stocker phase. I. Growth, partitioning of fat among depots, and carcass characteristics of growing-finishing beef cattle. Journal of Animal Science 91(9): 4322-4335, 2013

Effect of rate of weight gain of steers during the stocker phase. III. Gene expression of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle in growing-finishing beef cattle. Journal of Animal Science 92(4): 1462-1472, 2014

Effect of rate of weight gain of steers during the stocker phase. IV. Rumen fermentation characteristics and expression of genes involved in substrate utilization for fatty acid synthesis in adipose tissues of growing-finishing beef cattle. Journal of Animal Science 93(6): 3055-3065, 2015

Effect of prior rate of gain and end weight on energy metabolism, visceral organ mass and body composition of Angus X Hereford steers. Energy metabolism of farm animals: 287-290, 1989

Effects of winter growing program on visceral organ mass, composition, and oxygen consumption of beef steers during growing and finishing. Journal of Animal Science 88(4): 1554-1563, 2010

Effects of body weight, frame size and rate of gain on the composition of gain of beef steers. Journal of Animal Science 66(7): 1732-1738, 1988

Effect of live weight gain of steers during winter grazing: I. Feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and body composition of beef steers. Journal of Animal Science 82(1): 262-272, 2004

Anabolic implant effects on visceral organ mass, chemical body composition, and estimated energetic efficiency in cloned (genetically identical) beef steers. Journal of Animal Science 75(10): 2620-2626, 1997

Evaluation of hepatic markers and body weight gain in growing and finishing steers. Comparative Clinical Pathology 25(4): 721-725, 2016

Effects of high selenium wheat on carcass weight, visceral organ mass and intestinal growth in finishing beef steers. Journal of Animal Science 81(Suppl. 2): 95-96, 2003

The effect of rate of gain during the growing and finishing periods on the feed efficiency and carcass composition of the pig. 1. Rate of gain during the growing period from 18 to 57 kg live weight. J. Agric. Sci 71: 311-318, 1968

The effect of rate of gain during the growing and finishing periods on the feed efficiency and carcass composition of the pig i rate of gain during the growing period from 18 to 57 kilogram live weight. Journal of Agricultural Science 71(3): 311-318, 1968

Effect of live weight gain of steers during winter grazing: I. Feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and body composition of beef steers1,2,3. Journal of Animal Science 82(1): 262-272, 2004

Effect of high-selenium wheat on visceral organ mass, and intestinal cellularity and vascularity in finishing beef steers. Journal of Animal Science 82(6): 1788-1793, 2004

Energy and nutrient content of empty body, composition of body weight gain and energy utilization by growing bulls, heifers and steers. Aguilera, J F EAAP Publication; Energy metabolism of farm animals 241-244, 1994