Effects of high glucose on AVP-induced hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and type IV collagen synthesis in cultured rat mesangial cells

Tahara, A.; Tsukada, J.; Tomura, Y.; Yatsu, T.; Shibasaki, M.

Endocrine Research 37(4): 216-227

2012


ISSN/ISBN: 1532-4206
PMID: 22594926
DOI: 10.3109/07435800.2012.671400
Accession: 052869698

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Abstract
Hyperglycemia is a principal characteristic of diabetes and influences many cellular functions. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by glomerular mesangial expansion which could result from increased mesangial cell extracellular matrix synthesis induced by hyperglycemia. To investigate whether the physiological functions of mesangial cells are altered in a diabetic environment, we evaluated the effect of high extracellular glucose concentration on thymidine/leucine incorporation, hyperplasia/hypertrophy, and type IV collagen synthesis, induced by vasopressin (AVP), in cultured rat mesangial cells. The exposure of mesangial cells to a high glucose concentration (30 mM) significantly reduced AVP-induced thymidine incorporation and hyperplasia compared with normal glucose (10 mM). By contrast, treatment of mesangial cells with AVP in the presence of high extracellular glucose significantly increased leucine incorporation, hypertrophy, and type IV collagen synthesis compared with those at normal glucose levels. The administration of staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, reversed these effects of high-glucose conditions. Furthermore, the nonpeptide AVP V(1A) receptor-selective antagonists potently inhibited these AVP-induced physiological responses in mesangial cells cultured in high-glucose conditions. These results demonstrate that high glucose suppresses mesangial cell proliferation but enhances hypertrophy and type IV collagen synthesis induced by AVP. This increased mesangial cell hypertrophy and extracellular matrix synthesis may play a crucial role in the glomerular mesangial expansion common to diabetic nephropathy.