+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Evaluation of force applied during deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia using simulation



Evaluation of force applied during deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia using simulation



American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 204(3): 234.E1



We sought to objectively evaluate the amount of force applied during deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia among different providers. Providers who do deliveries at our institution were approached for participation. The simulation exercise used a childbirth mannequin that measures the amount of force the provider applies to the fetal head during delivery. The amount of force applied and information regarding the provider's level of experience, height, weight, and gender was recorded. This study was approved by the hospital institutional review board. A total of 47 providers participated. The mean force applied during each situation was not associated with the provider's experience, height, weight, or gender. Provider experience, gender, and body habitus were not associated with the amount of force applied during delivery. We found differences between family medicine and obstetrics/gynecology providers. In addition, a significant number of all providers (19/47, 40%) pulled >100 N.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 053072079

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 21093848

DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.10.904


Related references

Comparing clinician-applied loads for routine, difficult, and shoulder dystocia deliveries. American Journal Of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 171(6): 1621-1627, 1994

Pattern and degree of forces applied during simulation of shoulder dystocia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 197(2): 156.E1, 2007

Effect of clinician-applied maneuvers on brachial plexus stretch during a shoulder dystocia event: investigation using a computer simulation model. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 203(4): 339.E1, 2010

Objective evaluation of the shoulder dystocia phenomenon: effect of maternal pelvic orientation on force reduction. Obstetrics and Gynecology 74(1): 44-48, 1989

Improvement in documentation using an electronic checklist for shoulder dystocia deliveries. Obstetrics and Gynecology 116(1): 63-66, 2010

Risk of brachial plexus injury in shoulder dystocia deliveries by birthweight. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 178(1 Part 2): S77, 1998

Pregnancy week at delivery and the risk of shoulder dystocia: a population study of 2,014,956 deliveries. Bjog 121(1): 34-41, 2014

Prediction of brachial plexus strain in shoulder dystocia deliveries using computer modeling. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 187(6 Suppl.): S168, 2002

Risk of shoulder dystocia: associations with parity and offspring birthweight. A population study of 1 914 544 deliveries. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 91(4): 483-488, 2012

Comparing mechanical fetal response during descent, crowning, and restitution among deliveries with and without shoulder dystocia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 196(6): 539.E1, 2007

Current views and challenges on clinical cholera. Bioinformation 13(12): 405-409, 2017

Shoulder dystocia--risk factors and indicators. A retrospective analysis within an obstetric collective of 14,913 deliveries. Zeitschrift für Geburtshilfe und Neonatologie 212(6): 211-216, 2008

Risk factors and fetal outcome in cases of shoulder dystocia compared with normal deliveries of a similar birthweight. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 103(9): 868-872, 1996

Elective delivery of infants with macrosomia in diabetic women: Reduced shoulder dystocia versus increased cesarean deliveries. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 178(5): 922-925, 1998