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Extracts of edible and medicinal plants in inhibition of growth, adherence, and cytotoxin production of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli


Extracts of edible and medicinal plants in inhibition of growth, adherence, and cytotoxin production of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli



Journal of Food Science 76(6): M421-M426



ISSN/ISBN: 0022-1147

PMID: 22417513

DOI: 10.1111/j.1750-3841.2011.02229.x

Campylobacter spp. is recognized as one of the most common cause of food-borne bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. Campylobacter infection causes campylobacteriosis, which can range from asymptomatic to dysentery-type illnesses with severe complications, such as Guillian-Barre syndrome. Epidemiological studies have revealed that consumption of poultry products is an important risk factor of this disease. Adherence and cytotoxic activity of the bacteria to host mucosal surfaces have been proposed to be critical steps in pathogenesis. Innovative tools for controlling Campylobacter, such as natural products from plants, represent good alternatives for use in foods or as therapeutic agents. In this study, 28 edible or medicinal plants species were analyzed for their bactericidal effects on the growth of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli. The extracts of Acacia farnesiana, Artemisia ludoviciana, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Cynara scolymus were the most effective against these microorganisms at minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of 0.3, 0.5, 0.4, and 2.0 mg/mL, respectively. No effect on growth was detected with lower concentrations of extract (25%, 50%, or 75% of the MBC) added to the media. The effect of each extract (75% of the MBC) on adherence and cytotoxicity of C. jejuni and C. coli was evaluated in Vero cells. Adherence of Campylobacter to Vero cells was significantly affected by all the extracts. Cytotoxic activity of bacterial cultures was inhibited by A. farnesiana and A. ludoviciana. These plant extracts are potential candidates to be studied for controlling Campylobacter contamination in foods and the diseases associated with this microorganism. Innovative tools for controlling Campylobacter, such as natural products from plants, represent good alternatives for use in foods or as therapeutic agents. The extracts of Acacia farnesiana, Artemisia ludoviciana, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Cynara scolymus were the most effective against these microorganisms. Adherence and cytotoxic activity of the bacteria to host mucosal surfaces which are critical steps in pathogenesis were decreased by these extracts. Our results point to these plants as potential candidates for the control of Campylobacter contamination in foods, the treatment of the diseases associated with this microorganism, and as feed supplements to reduce on-farm prevalence of Campylobacter.

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Accession: 053170615

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