+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Factors associated with male mating success of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti



Factors associated with male mating success of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti



American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 80(3): 395-400



We studied the effects of male Aedes aegypti age, body size, and density on mating success under laboratory and field conditions. Older males under field conditions transferred the greatest number of sperm to females (1,152 by 1-day-old males to 1,892 sperm by 10-day-old males). Larger males inseminated females with more sperm than smaller ones. Male age, female body size, and density also influenced male mating success. Larger females successfully mated with males more often than smaller females, especially with older males (> 25 days old). Female insemination rates in small high-density laboratory cages (0.009 m(3)) were artificially high (81.6-98.7%) compared with rates (65.4-84.6%) in large low-density field cages (9 m(3)). This is the first study to systematically evaluate the effect of Ae. aegypti male body size and age on sperm transfer to females and the first one to evaluate the mating performance of males in a field setting.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 053193637

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19270288


Related references

The role of male harassment on female fitness for the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 66(8): 1131-1140, 2012

The effect of virus-blocking Wolbachia on male competitiveness of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases 8(12): E3294, 2014

Co-occurrence patterns of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and Aedes mediovitattus, a dengue competent mosquito in Puerto Rico. Ecohealth 8(3): 365-375, 2011

Male contributions during mating increase female survival in the disease vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Journal of Insect Physiology 108: 1-9, 2018

Collagen-binding protein, Aegyptin, regulates probing time and blood feeding success in the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111(19): 6946-6951, 2014

The electronic song "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites" reduces host attack and mating success in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Acta Tropica 194: 93-99, 2019

Male mating history and body size influence female fecundity and longevity of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Journal of Medical Entomology 48(2): 202-211, 2011

Synthesis, depletion and cell-type expression of a protein from the male accessory glands of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Journal of Insect Physiology 70: 117-124, 2014

Mating, ovariole number and sperm production of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti L in Australia broad thermal optima provide the capacity for survival in a changing climate. Physiological Entomology aop(aop): 0-0, 2012

Productivity and population density estimates of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) in Australia. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 27(3): 313-322, 2013

Identity and transfer of male reproductive gland proteins of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti: potential tools for control of female feeding and reproduction. Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 38(2): 176-189, 2008

Rapid evolution of reduced receptivity to interspecific mating in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in response to satyrization by invasive Aedes albopictus. Evolutionary Ecology 28(1): 193-203, 2014

Larval competition between the introduced vector of dengue fever in australia aedes aegypti and a native container breeding mosquito aedes notoscriptus diptera culicidae. Australian Journal of Zoology 34(4): 527-534, 1986

Possible jungle dengue recent studies and hypotheses distribution human primary host mosquito vector virus aedes aegypti monkey aedes albopictus. Japanese Journal of Medical Science & Biology 20(SUPP): 69-74, 1967

Larval competition between the introduced vector and dengue fever in Australia, Aedes aegypti (L.), and a native container-breeding mosquito, Aedes notoscriptus (Skuse) (Diptera Culicidae). Australian journal of zoology4(4): 527-534, 1986