+ Site Statistics
References:
52,654,530
Abstracts:
29,560,856
PMIDs:
28,072,755
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn

+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Familial interactions and physical, lifestyle, and dietary factors to affect bone mineral density of children in the KNHANES 2009-2010



Familial interactions and physical, lifestyle, and dietary factors to affect bone mineral density of children in the KNHANES 2009-2010



Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 32(4): 455-467



We examined familial bone mineral density (BMD) interactions between parents and children and lifestyle factors affecting BMD in the Korean general population of children under 20 and parents under 50 years of age. This cross-sectional study included 2,453 participants (667 daughters, 705 sons, 719 mothers, and 362 fathers) in the 2009-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We calculated prevalence ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for BMD values of whole femur, femur neck, lumbar spine, and whole body excluding the head being in the low tertile in adolescents according to parental BMD tertile after adjusting for physical, lifestyle, and dietary factors. For daughters and sons, there were significant differences in BMD at the four bone sites according to age group, body fat percentage, regular walking and exercise, and milk consumption compared to the reference value for each classification category. Surprisingly, there were no differences in BMD according to serum 25-OH-D levels. Birth order affected BMD of only whole body except head, but its impact was less than that of lifestyle factors. The mean differences in BMD between daughters and sons in the first and third parental BMD tertiles were statistically significant. Notably, the prevalence ratio of whole body without head BMD being in the low tertile increased eight and ten-folds in adolescent daughters and sons, respectively, when parents were in the low BMD tertile. In specific bone regions, parental BMD had a greater effect on total femur in daughters but in the lumbar spine in sons. In conclusion, parental BMD positively influences BMD in daughters and sons after adjustment for environmental parameters. This suggests that the children from parents with low BMD need to make an extra effort to increase BMD through dietary and lifestyle changes.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 053204482

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 24052208

DOI: 10.1007/s00774-013-0515-0


Related references

Impact of calcium and vitamin D insufficiencies on serum parathyroid hormone and bone mineral density: analysis of the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-3, 2009 and KNHANES V-1, 2010). Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 28(4): 764-770, 2016

Interactions between dietary calcium intake and bone mineral density or bone geometry in a low calcium intake population (KNHANES IV 2008-2010). Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 99(7): 2409-2417, 2014

Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and its relation to biological and lifestyle factors in middle-aged and aged Japanese women (Part 3). Relationships of physical fitness and lifestyle factors to bone mineral density in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi. Japanese Journal of Hygiene 50(4): 893-900, 1995

Favorable effect of dietary vitamin C on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women (KNHANES IV, 2009): discrepancies regarding skeletal sites, age, and vitamin D status. Osteoporosis International 26(9): 2329-2337, 2016

Body composition and bone density reference data for Korean children, adolescents, and young adults according to age and sex: results of the 2009-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 34(4): 429-439, 2015

The association between bone mineral density and periodontitis in Korean adults (KNHANES 2008-2010). Oral Diseases 20(6): 609-615, 2016

Different relationships between body compositions and bone mineral density according to gender and age in Korean populations (KNHANES 2008-2010). Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 99(10): 3811-3820, 2015

Association between prolonged breastfeeding and bone mineral density and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: KNHANES 2010-2011. Osteoporosis International 27(1): 257-265, 2016

Strong familial association of bone mineral density between parents and offspring: KNHANES 2008-2011. Osteoporosis International, 2016

Association between levels of serum ferritin and bone mineral density in Korean premenopausal and postmenopausal women: KNHANES 2008-2010. Plos One 9(12): E114972-E114972, 2015

Familial correlation of bone mineral density, birth data and lifestyle factors among adolescent daughters, mothers and grandmothers. Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism 28(6): 690-695, 2011

Lifestyle factors and duration of androgen deprivation affect bone mineral density of patients with prostate cancer during first year of therapy. Urology 70(1): 122-126, 2007

The association between higher serum ferritin level and lower bone mineral density is prominent in women ≥45 years of age (KNHANES 2008-2010). Osteoporosis International 24(10): 2627-2637, 2014

The relationship of dietary and lifestyle factors to bone mineral indexes in children. Journal of the American Dietetic Association 105(5): 735-741, 2005

25-Hydroxyvitamin D, calcium intake, and bone mineral content in adolescents and young adults: analysis of the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3, 2008-2009 and V-1, 2010). Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 98(9): 3627-3636, 2013