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Field evaluation of systemic imidacloprid for the management of avocado thrips and avocado lace bug in California avocado groves



Field evaluation of systemic imidacloprid for the management of avocado thrips and avocado lace bug in California avocado groves



Pest Management Science 66(10): 1129-1136



The efficacy of systemic applications of imidacloprid for the management of avocado thrips and avocado lace bug was determined in field trials. Following insecticide treatment by chemigation, leaves of appropriate age for each insect were sampled over a 6 month period and used for bioassays. Imidacloprid residues were measured by ELISA in leaves used for bioassays to determine concentrations of insecticide that were toxic to both pests. The uptake of imidacloprid into treated trees was extremely slow, peaking in the current year's leaf flush at only 8 ng cm(-2) leaf tissue after 15 weeks. Avocado thrips mortality in bioassays with young flush leaves, the preferred feeding substrate for this insect, was minimal, indicating that imidacloprid concentrations were below threshold levels needed for effective control. Residues present in older leaves, which are preferred by the avocado lace bug, were higher than in young flush leaves, and provided good control of this pest. Probit analysis of bioassay data showed that the avocado lace bug (LC(50) = 6.1 ng imidacloprid cm(-2) leaf tissue) was more susceptible to imidacloprid than the avocado thrips (LC(50) = 73 ng imidacloprid cm(-2) leaf tissue). In spite of the slow uptake of imidacloprid into avocado trees, the levels of imidacloprid would be sufficient to control avocado lace bug infestations. In contrast, the slow uptake would be problematic for avocado thrips control because inadequate levels of insecticide accumulate in new flush foliage and would allow avocado thrips populations to build to levels that would subsequently damage developing avocado fruit.

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Accession: 053238795

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 20623704

DOI: 10.1002/ps.1991



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