+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Loss of genetic diversity among ocelots in the United States during the 20th century linked to human induced population reductions



Loss of genetic diversity among ocelots in the United States during the 20th century linked to human induced population reductions



Plos one 9(2): E89384



Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in the United States currently exhibit low levels of genetic diversity. One hypothesis for this observation is that habitat fragmentation, resulting from human induced changes in the landscape during the 20(th) century, created island populations with highly reduced gene flow and increased genetic drift and inbreeding. In an effort to investigate this, we used a portion of the mitochondrial control region and 11 autosomal microsatellite loci to examine historical levels of genetic diversity and infer temporal changes in ocelot populations between 1853 and 2005. Levels of genetic diversity were higher in historical ocelot populations than in extant populations from Texas. The earliest documented loss of mitochondrial haplotype diversity occurred at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge. The second extant population inhabiting private lands in Willacy County retained higher levels of genetic diversity through the 1990s, but subsequently lost diversity over the next decade. A similar pattern was observed for autosomal microsatellite loci. This supports the argument that low levels of genetic diversity in Texas are related to human induced population reductions and fragmentation, both of which threaten the remaining ocelots in the United States. At this time, the best means of mitigating the continued erosion of genetic variation are translocation of individuals either from larger populations in Mexico to Texas, or between the Texas populations.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 054180060

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 24586737

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089384


Related references

Epidemiologic Characteristics of the United States Elderly Population in the 20th Century. European Journal of Epidemiology 2(1): 15-25, 1986

Epidemiologic characteristics of the United States elderly population in the 20th century. European Journal of Epidemiology 2(1): 15-25, 1986

A habitat-based population viability analysis for ocelots Leopardus pardalis in the United States. Biological Conservation 132(4): 424-436, 2006

A habitat-based population viability analysis for ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in the United States (vol 132, pg 424, 2006). Biological Conservation 136(2): 326-327, 2007

Significant floods in the United States during the 20th century. 2000

Psoriasis treatment in the United States at the end of the 20th century. International Journal of Dermatology 45(4): 370-374, 2006

The climate velocity of the contiguous United States during the 20th century. Global Change Biology 19(1): 241-251, 2013

Decommodification and Homicide Rates in the 20th-Century United States. Homicide Studies 6(1): 6-38, 2002

Trends in 20th century drought over the continental United States. Geophysical Research Letters 33(10), 2006

Magnitudes, patterns, and causes of 20th century floods in the United States. Abstracts with Programs - Geological Society of America 32(7): 508, 2000

The scientific advance of gastroenterology in the United States during the 20th century. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 31(1): 3-5, 2000

The 20th century cooling trend over the southeastern United States. Climate Dynamics 40(1-2): 341-352, 2013

Universal coverage in the United States: lessons from experience of the 20th century. Journal of Urban Health 78(1): 46-58, 2001

Toward generation XL: anthropometrics of longevity in late 20th-century United States. Economics and Human Biology 3(2): 271-295, 2005

Radiation oncology: contributions of the United States in the last years of the 20th century. Radiology 219(1): 1-5, 2001