+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Low prevalence of insulin resistance among HIV-infected children receiving nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy in Thailand



Low prevalence of insulin resistance among HIV-infected children receiving nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy in Thailand



HIV Medicine 10(2): 72-78



Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is reported to cause insulin resistance among adults, but effects on children are less clear. We attempted to describe the prevalence of insulin resistance among HIV-infected children receiving HAART. Insulin resistance was assessed at 96 weeks of treatment with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based HAART (nevirapine or efavirenz with stavudine and lamivudine) among children in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Insulin resistance was defined as homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) >/=3.16, fasting c-peptide >/=4.40 ng/mL or fasting insulin >/=25.0 muU/mL. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) was defined as glucose >/=110 mg/dL. Measurements were analysed for associations with age, lipodystrophy, treatment regimen and clinical data. The prevalence of insulin resistance was 6.5%; no child had IFG. Those with insulin resistance were older with higher body mass index. Children >/=10 years had higher HOMA-IR, c-peptide and insulin, but no difference was seen in the frequency of insulin resistance. No associations between insulin resistance and lipodystrophy or treatment regimen were detected. Insulin resistance is uncommon among children receiving NNRTI-based HAART and is unrelated to lipodystrophy.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 054186054

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19018877

DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-1293.2008.00653.x


Related references

Intermittent episodes of detectable HIV viremia in patients receiving nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based or protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens are equivalent in incidence and prognosis. Clinical Infectious Diseases 41(9): 1326-1332, 2005

Pattern and predictors of immunologic recovery in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children receiving non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 28(6): 488-492, 2009

Clinical outcomes of HIV-infected patients with Kaposi's sarcoma receiving nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy in Uganda. HIV Medicine 13(3): 166-171, 2012

CD4 cell count response to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor- or protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy in an observational cohort study. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 34(3): 347-348, 2003

Effect of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy on dysglycemia and insulin sensitivity in South African HIV-infected patients. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 57(4): 284-289, 2011

Efficacy of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy in Thai HIV-infected children aged two years or less. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 28(3): 246-248, 2009

HIV-1 drug resistance mutations in children after failure of first-line nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. HIV Medicine 11(9): 565-572, 2011

Treatment outcomes stratified by baseline immunological status among young children receiving nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. Clinical Infectious Diseases 44(9): 1245-1248, 2007

Postprandial response to a physiologic caloric load in HIV-positive patients receiving protease inhibitor-based or nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 82(1): 146-154, 2005

Research on the selective kinetics of HIV-1 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance-associated mutations among 4 AIDS patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi 29(8): 794-800, 2009

Long-term body composition and metabolic changes in antiretroviral naive persons randomized to protease inhibitor-, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-, or protease inhibitor plus nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based strategy. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 44(5): 506-517, 2007

Relapse of Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV-infected patients switching from a protease inhibitor to a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy regimen. Aids 17(10): 1580-1581, 2003

Insulin resistance and lipid profiles in HIV-infected Thai children receiving lopinavir/ritonavir-based highly active antiretroviral therapy. Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism 27(5-6): 403-412, 2014

Impact of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors on mitochondria in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 51(12): 4236-4242, 2007

Malaria in HIV-Infected Children Receiving HIV Protease-Inhibitor- Compared with Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy, IMPAACT P1068s, Substudy to P1060. Plos One 11(12): E0165140, 2017