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Metacognition and learning about primacy and recency effects in free recall: the utilization of intrinsic and extrinsic cues when making judgments of learning



Metacognition and learning about primacy and recency effects in free recall: the utilization of intrinsic and extrinsic cues when making judgments of learning



Memory and Cognition 36(2): 429-437



Although memory researchers know about primacy and recency effects, it is unclear whether students are aware of these effects and incorporate them when making judgments of learning (JOLs). The present research examined how participants use serial position information (extrinsic cues) when making JOLs after studying each item and showed that participants rely on the intrinsic qualities of the items and underestimate primacy and recency effects. However, when participants made JOLs prior to studying each item and engaged in multiple study-test sessions, their JOLs accurately reflected recall, as well as when serial position information was explicitly provided during the study phase. The findings are interpreted in a cue utilization framework and suggest that under certain conditions, participants can predict primacy and recency effects.

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Accession: 054344972

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 18426071

DOI: 10.3758/mc.36.2.429


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