+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study



Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study



International Journal of Nursing Studies 45(5): 668-681



Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment. To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated. Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives-a demanding resource, which appeared in the text along with a number of sub-themes. Ideally, collaboration was considered important and described as a planned process, but in practice encounters with relatives were coincidental. Relatives were ideally considered a resource but also experienced as demanding, and nurses sometimes even avoided them. The nurses seemed unaware of the conflict of values, and their response pattern of escape-avoidance and labelling of relatives as difficult may be an indication of counter transference as a reaction to moral conflict. Macro level factors, such as organisational and societal values, and micro level factors, such as organisation of care, nurse's competence and communication skills, seemingly governed nurses' collaboration with relatives. Although the nurses could be seen as mere victims of conflicting values, there appeared to be potential for improving collaboration practice within the restrictions of macro level factors by interventions at the micro level.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 054688701

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17362957

DOI: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2007.01.010


Related references

Collaboration Between Relatives of Older Patients and Nurses in Acute Medical Wards: Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Revised Family Collaboration Scale. Journal of Nursing Measurement 26(2): 311-340, 2018

Collaboration between relatives of elderly patients and nurses and its relation to satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 22(4): 507-519, 2008

Relatives' view on collaboration with nurses in acute wards: development and testing of a new measure. International Journal of Nursing Studies 45(9): 1329-1343, 2008

Care transitions for frail, older people from acute hospital wards within an integrated healthcare system in England: a qualitative case study. International Journal of Integrated Care 14: E009, 2014

Can trained volunteers make a difference at mealtimes for older people in hospital? A qualitative study of the views and experience of nurses, patients, relatives and volunteers in the Southampton Mealtime Assistance Study. International Journal of Older people Nursing 10(2): 136-145, 2015

A comparative study of the characteristics and social backgrounds of frail and elderly persons at home, long-stay elderly hospital patients, and residents of welfare homes for the frail elderly. Japanese Journal of Public Health 39(4): 215-222, 1992

Multidisciplinary meetings with relatives of elderly hospital patients in continuing-care wards. Age and Ageing 6(1): 1-5, 1977

Flawed communications: Health professionals' experience of collaboration in the care of frail elderly patients. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 46(7): 680-689, 2018

Culturaly diverse family members and their hospitalised relatives in acute care wards: a qualitative study. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing 24(1): 15-20, 2006

The contribution of advanced practice nurses in the care of the frail and agitated elderly in emergencies: State of the art and qualitative study]/The contribution of advanced practice nurses in the care of the frail and agitated elderly in emergencies: State of the art and qualitative study. Recherche en Soins Infirmiers 2018(135): 60-82, 2018

Challenges Encountered by Nurses Working in Acute Psychiatric Wards: A Qualitative Study in Iran. Issues in Mental Health Nursing 39(3): 244-250, 2018

Derivation and validation of a mortality-risk index from a cohort of frail elderly patients hospitalised in medical wards via emergencies: the SAFES study. European Journal of Epidemiology 23(12): 783-791, 2008

Usefulness of serum albumin concentration for in-hospital risk stratification in frail, elderly patients with acute heart failure. Insights from a prospective, monocenter study. International Journal of Cardiology 125(2): 265-267, 2008

Frail elderly patients' experiences of information on medication. A qualitative study. Bmc Geriatrics 12: 46, 2012

The negative attitudes of nurses towards older patients in the acute hospital setting: a qualitative descriptive study. Contemporary Nurse 26(2): 225-237, 2007